Their Fathers Daughters: Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Patriarchal Complicity by Elizabeth Kowaleski-wallaceTheir Fathers Daughters: Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Patriarchal Complicity by Elizabeth Kowaleski-wallace

Their Fathers Daughters: Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Patriarchal Complicity

byElizabeth Kowaleski-wallace

Hardcover | September 1, 1994

Pricing and Purchase Info

$204.11

Earn 1021 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Current feminist theory has developed powerful explanations for some women writers' rebellion against patriarchy. But other women writers did not rebel; rather, they supported and celebrated patriarchy. Examining the lives and selected works of two late eighteenth-century writers, Hannah Moreand Maria Edgeworth, this book explores what it means for a woman writer to identify with her father and the patriarchal tradition he represents. Kowaleski-Wallace exposes the psychological, social, and historical factors that motivated such an identification, and reveals the consequences thatresult from being a "daddy's girl."
Elizabeth Kowaleski-Wallace is at Simmons College.
Loading
Title:Their Fathers Daughters: Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Patriarchal ComplicityFormat:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 8.54 × 5.87 × 0.94 inPublished:September 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019506853X

ISBN - 13:9780195068535

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

What does it mean for a woman writer to identify strongly with her father and with the patriarchal tradition he represents? What factors-psychological, social, historical, or otherwise-motivate such identification? What are the consequences? This engrossing study addresses these questions through a close examination of lives and selected works of two late eighteenth-century women writers, Hannah More and Maria Edgeworth, both of whom were complicitous with their fathers' politics.

Editorial Reviews

"Kowaleski-Wallace's analysis of the class bias that informs More's patriarchal complicity is well argued."--South Atlantic Review