Theories of Defects in Solids

Paperback | March 1, 2001

byMarshall Stoneham

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This book surveys the theory of defects in solids, concentrating on the electronic structure of point defects in insulators and semiconductors. The relations between different approaches are described, and the predictions of the theory compared critically with experiment. The physicalassumptions and approximations are emphasized. Theory of Defects in Solids begins with the perfect solid, then reviews the main methods of calculating defect energy levels and wave functions. The calculation of observable defect properties is discussed, and finally, the theory is applied to a range of defects that are very different in nature.This book is intended for research workers and graduate students interested in solid-state physics.

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This book surveys the theory of defects in solids, concentrating on the electronic structure of point defects in insulators and semiconductors. The relations between different approaches are described, and the predictions of the theory compared critically with experiment. The physicalassumptions and approximations are emphasized. Theor...

Professor Marshall Stoneham, FRS Centre for Materials Research Department of Physics and Astronomy University College London
Format:PaperbackDimensions:996 pages, 9.29 × 6.3 × 2.24 inPublished:March 1, 2001Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199532508

ISBN - 13:9780199532506

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`[This] is an excellent work which covers both theoretical and experimental bases of the subject. . .[T]his book will be very useful to a wide range of researchers and graduate students interested in solid state science, both to theorists who want to relate their own work to the many previouscalculations and to experimentalists who want to know about present theories. 'Math