Theory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: `Divinitie, and Poesie, Met' by Elizabeth ClarkeTheory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: `Divinitie, and Poesie, Met' by Elizabeth Clarke

Theory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: `Divinitie, and Poesie, Met'

byElizabeth Clarke

Hardcover | September 1, 1997

Pricing and Purchase Info

$214.43 online 
$300.00 list price save 28%
Earn 1,072 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In seventeenth-century England the poet George Herbert became known as `Divine Herbert', his poetry a model for those aspiring to the status of inspired Christian poet. This book explores the relationship between the poetry of George Herbert and the concept of divine inspiration rooted indevotional texts of the time. Clarke considers three very different treatises read and approved by Herbert: Savonarola's De Simplicitate Christianae Vitae, Juan de Valdes's The Hundred and Ten Considerations, and Francois de Sales's Introduction to the Devout Life. These authors all saw literaryproduction as implicit in a theological argument about the workings of the Holy Spirit. Clarke goes on to offer a new reading of many of Herbert's poems, concluding that implanted in Herbert's poetry are many well-established codes which to a seventeenth-century readership signified divineinspiration.
Elizabeth Clarke is at Nottingham Trent University.
Loading
Title:Theory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: `Divinitie, and Poesie, Met'Format:HardcoverDimensions:306 pages, 8.43 × 5.43 × 0.87 inPublished:September 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198263988

ISBN - 13:9780198263982

Look for similar items by category:

Editorial Reviews

`Most students of Herbert will be pleased by the light Clarke sheds on Herbert's poetic methods. She buils a strong argument for the importance of the reader in Herbert's poetic/theological position. The book... provides an original contirbution to the understanding of poetic method forHerbert and for Christian poetry in the seventeeth-century.'Douglas A. Northrop, Renaissance Quarterly