Thin Lizzy Uncensored On the Record by Bob Carruthers

Thin Lizzy Uncensored On the Record

byBob Carruthers

Kobo ebook | February 12, 2012

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This is the true story of Thin Lizzy as told by the men who toured and recorded with the band from the rough beginnings in Dublin to the days of superstardom. Featuring in-depth interviews from guitarist Eric Bell and Terry ONeill, Thin Lizzys first manager, this book helps strip away the layers of sensationalism and half truths and produce the ultimate critical review of Thin Lizzy. This eBook also features a track-by-track analysis of every Thin Lizzy and Phil Lynott studio album release.
Title:Thin Lizzy Uncensored On the RecordFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:February 12, 2012Publisher:Coda Books LtdLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1906783748

ISBN - 13:9781906783747

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Potential of Lynott vs his Demons Short and sad story; always good to learn more about Lizzy and the tragic short life of Lynott. The song list and comments at the end are OK but he seems generous with his praise of a few songs i.e "Hero and Madman" and "Boogie Woogie Dance" are some of the worst songs from the Boys but the author does not offer enough criticism when needed. Also, he mentioned a few early songs that were incorporated in later works but did not follow-up on that interesting thought. I learned more about Grand Slam and again, the frustration of the potential of that group vs. Phil's addiction and early demise. The fact that Phil Lynott was not asked by his friend and countryman Sir Bob Geldof to be in "Live Aid" in the summer of 1985 us telling of the true extent of the fall from the top that Phil experienced; it seems only his mother was in his corner at the end.
Date published: 2014-04-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Potential of Lynott vs his Demons Short and sad story; always good to learn more about Lizzy and the tragic short life of Lynott. The song list and comments at the end are OK but he seems generous with his praise of a few songs i.e "Hero and Madman" and "Boogie Woogie Dance" are some of the worst songs from the Boys but the author does not offer enough criticism when needed. Also, he mentioned a few early songs that were incorporated in later works but did not follow-up on that interesting thought. I learned more about Grand Slam and again, the frustration of the potential of that group vs. Phil's addiction and early demise. The fact that Phil Lynott was not asked by his friend and countryman Sir Bob Geldof to be in "Live Aid" in the summer of 1985 us telling of the true extent of the fall from the top that Phil experienced; it seems only his mother was in his corner at the end.
Date published: 2014-04-24