This Species of Property: Slave Life and Culture in the Old South

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byLeslie Howard OwensAs told byLeslie H. Cwens

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Owens' fascinating study explores the personality and behavior of the slave within the context of what it meant to be a slave. Based on a variety of plantation records, diaries, slave narratives, travelers' accounts, and other items bearing on the slave's experiences in his relationships toslaveholders, it concentrates on the years between 1770 and 1865.

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From Our Editors

In some areas of analysis This Species of Property provides a fuller description of slave life than can be found elsewhere. Its appearance is another welcome indication that the slaves rather than their owners are now holding the center of the historiographical stage.

From the Publisher

Owens' fascinating study explores the personality and behavior of the slave within the context of what it meant to be a slave. Based on a variety of plantation records, diaries, slave narratives, travelers' accounts, and other items bearing on the slave's experiences in his relationships toslaveholders, it concentrates on the years be...

Leslie Howard Owens is at State University of New York, Stony Brook.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 7.99 × 5.31 × 0.59 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195022459

ISBN - 13:9780195022452

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From Our Editors

In some areas of analysis This Species of Property provides a fuller description of slave life than can be found elsewhere. Its appearance is another welcome indication that the slaves rather than their owners are now holding the center of the historiographical stage.

Editorial Reviews

"A work of original scholarship presented in an accessible and 'student-friendly' style."--John Rhinehart, San Bernadino Valley College