Thomas Alva Edison: Inventing the Electric Age

by Gene Adair

Oxford University Press | October 1, 1997 | Trade Paperback

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Thomas Alva Edison revolutionized daily life as few people before or after him have done. The light bulb, the phonograph, motion pictures--through these and countless other technological marvels Edison left an indelible mark on the modern world. Although he had little formal education, Edison showed a remarkable talent for practical science as a teenager and was only in his early twenties when he launched his inventing career. In 1876, he established the world's first industrial research laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, and within six years he and his assistants had developed a light-and-power system that amazed the world. For more than half a century, Edison remained active and involved in science and invention. Upon Edison's death in 1931, President Herbert Hoover asked the nation to dim its lights in tribute to the inventor.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 144 pages, 9.25 × 6.5 × 0.68 in

Published: October 1, 1997

Publisher: Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0195119819

ISBN - 13: 9780195119817

Found in: Reference
Appropriate for ages: 12 - adult

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– More About This Product –

Thomas Alva Edison: Inventing the Electric Age

Thomas Alva Edison: Inventing the Electric Age

by Gene Adair

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 144 pages, 9.25 × 6.5 × 0.68 in

Published: October 1, 1997

Publisher: Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0195119819

ISBN - 13: 9780195119817

From the Publisher

Thomas Alva Edison revolutionized daily life as few people before or after him have done. The light bulb, the phonograph, motion pictures--through these and countless other technological marvels Edison left an indelible mark on the modern world. Although he had little formal education, Edison showed a remarkable talent for practical science as a teenager and was only in his early twenties when he launched his inventing career. In 1876, he established the world's first industrial research laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, and within six years he and his assistants had developed a light-and-power system that amazed the world. For more than half a century, Edison remained active and involved in science and invention. Upon Edison's death in 1931, President Herbert Hoover asked the nation to dim its lights in tribute to the inventor.

About the Author

Gene Adair, who has worked in publishing since 1981, is currently the marketing manager at the University of Tennessee Press. A former teacher and newspaper reporter, he is also the author of a biography of George Washington Carver. He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee.

From Our Editors

KWith the light bulb, the phonograph, motion pictures, and countless other technological marvels, Thomas Alva Edison revolutionized daily life as few people before or after him have done. ". . . his life reads like the adventure it was and will delight pleasure readers and information seekers alike. Adair (the author) carefully explains the scientific principles on which Edison based his work and devotes sidebars to particular inventions".--BOOKLIST. Illustrated

Editorial Reviews

"A lively biography.... This foray into the workshops of a gifted and prolific inventor is fascinating."--Kirkus Reviews

Appropriate for ages: 12 - adult