Threats Of Quotas In International Trade: Their Effect On The Exporting Country

Hardcover | February 1, 1988

byGerard Lawrence Stockhausen

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Trade disruption and industrial organization are the subject of this penetrating look at the effects of the "new protectionism" in international trade. This volume provides five case studies of threats and protection in particular industries as a basis for discussion of the political economy of quota threats. Stockhausen analyzes the effects of quota threats on countries with competition in the export industry, on countries with monopoly in the export industry, and on those with duopoly or oligopoly in the export industry. Consideration is given both to large--and small--country cases under varying cost structures. The effects of relaxing some of the assumptions in the model, especially allowing for consumers and suppliers from third world countries, are also discussed.

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Trade disruption and industrial organization are the subject of this penetrating look at the effects of the "new protectionism" in international trade. This volume provides five case studies of threats and protection in particular industries as a basis for discussion of the political economy of quota threats. Stockhausen analyzes the e...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:170 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:February 1, 1988Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:031325785X

ISBN - 13:9780313257858

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?Stockhausen's book tackles a timely and complex issue -- the use of quotas or threats of quotas to extract concessions and other benefits from trading partners. The author presents an excellent review of recent experience with quotas, concentrating on five cases; textiles, steel, color television, autos, and footwear. Most of the book is devoted to technical models of exporting-country response to threats of quotas under a variety of scenarios. The models are not always presented in a clear and straightforward fashion and are probably not accessible to undergraduates. The case studies at the beginning and the policy conclusions derived from the models, however, make this book a worthwhile acquisition for solid upper-division and graduate collections in trade policy.?-Choice