Three Centuries Of American Prints by Judith BrodieThree Centuries Of American Prints by Judith Brodie

Three Centuries Of American Prints

byJudith Brodie

Hardcover | September 13, 2016

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Nearly 200 American prints, representing more than 100 artists, and dating from the colonial era to the present day, are brought together in this unprecedented volume from the National Gallery of Art to commemorate its collection and recent acquisitions. The artists featured range from Paul Revere through James McNeil Whistler, Mary Cassatt, Winslow Homer, Louise Nevelson, Romare Bearden, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Chuck Close, and Kara Walker. The works date from essentially every period in American history, so major art and historical themes running through the collection are readily visible. Lending context, twelve contributing authors discuss the varied themes in American art. Biographies of the artists and a glossary of printmaking terms are also featured.

Since its founding in 1941, the National Gallery of Art has assiduously collected American prints with the help of many generous donors. The Gallery’s American print collection has grown from nearly 1,900 prints in 1950 to more than 22,500 prints today. The collection was recently transformed by the acquisition of an extraordinary group of 5,200 American prints brought together by Reba and Dave Williams.

Michael J. Lewis is the Faison-Pierson-Stoddard Professor of Art History, Williams College.
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Title:Three Centuries Of American PrintsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:306 pages, 11.82 × 9.91 × 1.6 inPublished:September 13, 2016Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0500239525

ISBN - 13:9780500239520

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Editorial Reviews

The innovative and handsomely illustrated companion volume makes its own lasting impression….Print exhibition catalogs are not generally known for their biting wit. — Antiques and The Arts Weekly