Three Eyes for the Journey: African Dimensions of the Jamaican Religious Experience by Dianne M. Stewart

Three Eyes for the Journey: African Dimensions of the Jamaican Religious Experience

byDianne M. Stewart

Paperback | October 15, 2004

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Studies of African-derived religious traditions have generally focused on their retention of African elements. This emphasis, says Dianne Stewart, slights the ways in which communities in the African diaspora have created and formed religious meaning. In this fieldwork-based study Stewartshows that African people have been agents of their own religious, ritual, and theological formation.

About The Author

Dianne M. Stewart is Assistant Professor of Religion at Emory University.
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Details & Specs

Title:Three Eyes for the Journey: African Dimensions of the Jamaican Religious ExperienceFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 6.1 × 9.21 × 0.79 inPublished:October 15, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195175573

ISBN - 13:9780195175578

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"Dianne Stewart's Three Eyes for the Journey is a provocative and engaging account of the African-derived religious traditions of Jamaica. Her lived experience and her field research in Jamaica and other parts of the black Atlantic world enable her to establish in significant depth thehistorical contour and scholarly interpretation of indigenous Jamaican religious and cultural traditions. Stewart has brilliantly mapped out a new approach to the study of a Caribbean religion. The book should be required reading for theologians, historians of religion, and ordinary readers who areinterested in Jamaican religion, culture and society." --Jacob K. Olupona, Director and Professor, African American and African Studies, The University of California, Davis