Threshold Of Fire: A NOVEL OF FIFTH-CENTURY ROME by Hella S. HaasseThreshold Of Fire: A NOVEL OF FIFTH-CENTURY ROME by Hella S. Haasse

Threshold Of Fire: A NOVEL OF FIFTH-CENTURY ROME

byHella S. HaasseTranslated byAnita Miller, Nini Blinstrub

Paperback | August 30, 2005

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It is 414 A.D. and the once-powerful Roman Empire is in its death throes—split between East and West, menaced by barbarian hordes almost literally at its gates. The Emperor Honorious cowers in the marsh-bound city of Ravenna, where he has moved the government. There is the Prefect Hadrian, a powerful official and fanatical Christian convert; Marcus Anicius, the pagan aristocrat who is clinging to a dyping past, and the Jew Eliezar ben Elijah, hemmed in by his own traditions and burdened by his dark vision of the future.
Hella S. Haasse has written 17 novels as well as poetry, plays and essays, and has received many honors and awards including the Netherlands State Award for Literature. Her books have been translated into English, French, German, Swedish, Italian, Hungarian, Serbo-Croatian and Welsh.
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Title:Threshold Of Fire: A NOVEL OF FIFTH-CENTURY ROMEFormat:PaperbackDimensions:255 pages, 7 × 4.5 × 0.8 inPublished:August 30, 2005Publisher:Chicago Review Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0897334264

ISBN - 13:9780897334266

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Reviews

From Our Editors

In this vivid, dynamic novel, Hella Haasse has once more brought the past to life. This time she has chosen to illuminate a crucial, yet relatively obscure, period of history: it is 414 A.D. and the once-powerful Roman Empire is in its death throes -- split between East and West, menaced by barbarian hordes almost literally at its gates. The Emperor Honorius, an incompetent weakling, cowers in the marsh-bound city of Ravenna, where he has moved the government; he rarely "makes entry" into Rome.This is the brilliant canvas against which the characters in this drama interact. There is the Prefect Hadrian, a powerful official and fanatical Christian convert; there is Marcus Anicius, the pagan aristocrat who is clinging to a dying past, and there is the Jew Eliezar ben Elijah, hemmed in by his own traditions and burdened by his dark vision of the future. There is the intrigue and uncertainty of life at Honorius's court, and there are the streets and tenements of Rome, pulsating with life and with corruption

Editorial Reviews

"Rich in psychological and historical detail, with both the characters and ancient Rome vibrantly alive: a subtle, quiet tale eloquently told." — Kirkus Reviews