Trade Imbalance: The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking by Susan Ariel AaronsonTrade Imbalance: The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking by Susan Ariel Aaronson

Trade Imbalance: The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking

bySusan Ariel Aaronson, Jamie M. Zimmerman

Paperback | October 8, 2007

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In many countries, citizens allege that trade policies undermine specific rights such as labor rights, the right to health, or the right to political participation. However, in some countries, policy makers use trade policies to promote human rights. Although scholars, policy makers, and activists have long debated this relationship, in truth we know very little about it. This book enters this murky territory with three goals. First, it aims to provide readers with greater insights into the relationship between human rights and trade. Second, it includes the first study of how South Africa, Brazil, the United States, and the European Union coordinate trade and human rights objectives and resolve conflicts. It also looks at how human rights issues are seeping into the WTO. Finally, it provides suggestions to policy makers for making their trade and human rights policies more coherent.
Susan Ariel Aaronson is Senior Fellow at the National Policy Institute & occasional commentator on National Public Radio's "Morning Edition."
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Title:Trade Imbalance: The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade PolicymakingFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:348 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inShipping dimensions:8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:October 8, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521694205

ISBN - 13:9780521694209

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Table of Contents

Foreword; Preface and acknowledgments; 1. Introduction; 2. The World Trade Organization and human rights; 3. South Africa; 4. Brazil; 5. European Union; 6. United States 7. Conclusion and recommendations; Appendix: interviews.