Tradition and Reform: Land Tenure and Rural Development in South-East Asia by Mark ClearyTradition and Reform: Land Tenure and Rural Development in South-East Asia by Mark Cleary

Tradition and Reform: Land Tenure and Rural Development in South-East Asia

byMark Cleary, Peter Eaton

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

Pricing and Purchase Info

$48.50

Earn 243 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The majority of the population of South-East Asia depends on the land for its living. Land is held in a multitude of different ways- through tribal custom, as individual owner-occupier units, through plantations; in many parts of the region landlessness is a major social and political issue.Using a wide range of case studies, the authors examine the different landholding systems of the region and argue that a combination of traditional and reformed tenure systems offers the best prospects for improving the welfare of the rural population.
Mark Cleary is at University of Plymouth. Peter Eaton is at Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei.
Loading
Title:Tradition and Reform: Land Tenure and Rural Development in South-East AsiaFormat:HardcoverDimensions:160 pages, 9.72 × 6.02 × 0.59 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9676531081

ISBN - 13:9789676531087

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

Despite rapid urban and industrial growth in South-East Asia, the majority of the region's population is still dependent on the land for its living. Land tenure - the way in which ownership and use rights of land are acquired, regulated, and transferred - is thus a vital issue in the region. Rural development strategies at all scales - from the transmigration programmes of Indonesia to individual plantation reforms in Papua New Guinea - have to take account of the historical, social, and economic character of differing land tenure systems. Does, for example, owner-occupation provide the best incentives for economic efficiency? To what extent do traditional, customary tenure systems ensure the fair and environmentally sustainable stewardship of the land? How might plantation systems be adapted in order to reconcile the demands for social equity against those of greater output? Tradition and Reform seeks to provide both a context within which to examine such questions and a range of case-studies to illustrate some of the varied options developed by governments in th