Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy by Dana LaCourse MunteanuTragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy by Dana LaCourse Munteanu

Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy

byDana LaCourse Munteanu

Hardcover | December 26, 2011

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Scholars have often focused on understanding Aristotle's poetic theory, and particularly the concept of catharsis in the Poetics, as a response to Plato's critique of pity in the Republic. However, this book shows that, while Greek thinkers all acknowledge pity and some form of fear as responses to tragedy, each assumes for the two emotions a different purpose, mode of presentation and, to a degree, understanding. This book reassesses expressions of the emotions within different tragedies and explores emotional responses to and discussions of the tragedies by contemporary philosophers, providing insights into the ethical and social implications of the emotions.
Title:Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and TragedyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:292 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.79 inPublished:December 26, 2011Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521765102

ISBN - 13:9780521765107

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Table of Contents

Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy in the Poetics.