Trampoline: An Ilustrated Novel by Robert GipeTrampoline: An Ilustrated Novel by Robert Gipe

Trampoline: An Ilustrated Novel

byRobert Gipe

Hardcover | March 15, 2015

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about

Winner of the 2015 Weatherford Award in Fiction
Finalist, Judy Gaines Young Book Award

Dawn Jewell is fifteen. She is restless, curious, and wry. She listens to Black Flag, speaks her mind, and joins her grandmother’s fight against mountaintop removal mining almost in spite of herself. “I write by ear,” says Robert Gipe, and Dawn’s voice is the essence of his debut novel, Trampoline. She lives in eastern Kentucky with her addict mother and her Mamaw, whose stance against the coal companies has earned her the community’s ire. Jagged and honest, Trampoline is a powerful portrait of a place struggling with the economic and social forces that threaten and define it. Inspired by oral tradition and punctuated by Gipe’s raw and whimsical drawings, it is above all about its heroine, Dawn, as she decides whether to save a mountain or save herself; be ruled by love or ruled by anger; remain in the land of her birth or run for her life.

Robert Gipe lives in Harlan, Kentucky, and grew up in Kingsport, Tennessee. His fiction has appeared in Appalachian Heritage, Still, Motif, and Pine Mountain Sand & Gravel.
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Title:Trampoline: An Ilustrated NovelFormat:HardcoverDimensions:360 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:March 15, 2015Publisher:Ohio University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0821421522

ISBN - 13:9780821421529

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“There are the books you like, and the books you love, and then there are the ones you want to hold to your heart for a minute after you turn the last page. Robert Gipe’s illustrated novel Trampoline is one of those—not just well written, which it is; and not just visually appealing, which the wonderfully deadpan black-and-white drawings make sure of; but there is something deeply lovable about it, an undertow of affection you couldn’t fight if you wanted to. …Gipe deftly avoids every single cliché that could trip such a story up, which includes having a pitch-perfect ear for dialect and making it into something marvelous.” —Lisa Peet, Library Journal’s “What We’re Reading”