Trans-Pacific Interactions: The United States and China, 1880-1950 by V. KünnemannTrans-Pacific Interactions: The United States and China, 1880-1950 by V. Künnemann

Trans-Pacific Interactions: The United States and China, 1880-1950

EditorV. Künnemann, R. Mayer

Hardcover | November 18, 2009

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This book explores particular facets of the history and representation of the Pacific Rim region, fo­cusing on the interactions between the United States and China at the beginning of the twentieth century. It critically examines contemporary discourses on such seemingly recent concepts as transna­tion­alism and cultural citizenship, showing that they can ac­tually be traced much further back, and that they are closely tied to the debates around nationalism, global capitalism, and religion of the time. This series of reflections on political exchanges and conflicts offers a special focus on the cultural—literary, popular, and religious—implications of these interactions.

Vanessa Künnemann is Assistant Professor in American Studies at the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Uni­versity in Hannover, Germany. Her research focuses on questions of gender and ethnicity in American literature of the 19th and 20th century, on intercultural exchange, and on popu­lar culture. Her cur­rent project is concerned with missio...
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Title:Trans-Pacific Interactions: The United States and China, 1880-1950Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0 inPublished:November 18, 2009Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230619053

ISBN - 13:9780230619050

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Reviews

Table of Contents

Vanessa Künnemann, Ruth Mayer / Transnational Nationalisms – China and the United States in a Pacific World. An Introduction * PART I: NATIONALISMS AND CONFIGURATION OF NATIONAL IDENTITY IN CHINA AND THE UNITED STATES * Yong Chen / The American Dream and Dreams of China: A Transnational Approach to Chinese American History * Klaus Mühlhahn / National Studies and Global Entanglements: The Re-Envisioning of China in the Early Twentieth Century * Nicola Spakowski / China in the World: Constructions of a Chinese Identity in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century * PART II: CHINESE AMERICA, CITIZENSHIP, NATIONALITY, AND THE WORLD * Ruth Mayer / Paper Citizens and Biometrical Identification. Immigration, Nationality, and Belonging in Chinese America during the Exclusion Era * Madeline Y. Hsu / Befriending the Yellow Peril: Student Migration and the Warming of American Attitudes towards Chinese, 1905-1950 * Scott Wong / Between the 'Mountain of Tang' and the 'Adopted Land': The Chinese American Periodical Press and the Emergence of Chinese American Identities in the Face of Exclusion * PART III: MISSIONARY INTERVENTIONS: CULTURAL MISSION AND THE INTERNALIZATION OF CHINA, 1830-1950 * Thoralf Klein / Christian Mission and the Internationalization of China, 1830-1950 * Vanessa Künnemann / Following with bleeding footsteps?' American Missions in China and the (Gendered) Critique of Pearl S. Buck * Dominika Ferens / The Deserving Heathen: Missionary Ethnography of China and its American Converts

Editorial Reviews

“The book provides insights into how national and individual identities within both China and the United States were influenced by processes, perceptions, and activities in other countries.”—H-Net“This collection complicates our picture of U.S. history by demonstrating the ways in which transnational interactions shaped the dynamics of a society that was influenced by, and defined itself through/against, the trans-Pacific flows of ideas, goods, and people. In this way, Trans-Pacific Interactions fits well into a scholarly debate that attempts to transnationalize U.S. history.”--Sebastian Conrad, European University Institute, Florence“Trans-Pacific Interactions reminds us the best scholarship restlessly probes and reframes, defying static fields, separations, and national borders. Chinese studies has never been strictly ‘Chinese,’ American studies never simply ‘Euro-American,’ and Chinese-American studies never just of an ‘ethnic’ group. This is an excellent, forward-thinking colloquy of top scholars contextualized wonderfully by our German colleagues Mayer and Künnemann.”--John Kuo Wei Tchen, New York University and Museum of Chinese in America