Transforming Women's Work: New England Lives in the Industrial Revolution by Thomas DublinTransforming Women's Work: New England Lives in the Industrial Revolution by Thomas Dublin

Transforming Women's Work: New England Lives in the Industrial Revolution

byThomas Dublin

Paperback | August 17, 1995

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"No historian has done more to illuminate the achievements of female labor in the early textile mills than Thomas Dublin. . . . In this latest book, he provides a broad account of women's work during the industrial transformation of America, giving us the chance to test the typicality of the factory experience against other forms of female employment. He mines a breathtaking array of sources, including business records, census data, deeds, wills, diaries, and personal correspondence, to reconstruct the circumstances surrounding women's work in New England from the 1820s to 1900. . . . Dublin's ingenious detective work in matching families in archival sources enables him to make important points."—Women's Review of Books

Thomas Dublin is State University of New York Distinguished Professor of History at Binghamton University. He is the author or editor of several books, includingWhen the Mines Closed: Stories of Struggles in Hard Times, also from Cornell.
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Title:Transforming Women's Work: New England Lives in the Industrial RevolutionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:344 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.27 inPublished:August 17, 1995Publisher:Cornell University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801480906

ISBN - 13:9780801480904

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From Our Editors

This book explores the work and family lives of rural and urban New Englanders across the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century.

Editorial Reviews

"An elegant and important contribution to the literature on women's employment."—Louise A. Tilly