Trinity And Incarnation In Anglo-saxon Art And Thought by Barbara C. RawTrinity And Incarnation In Anglo-saxon Art And Thought by Barbara C. Raw

Trinity And Incarnation In Anglo-saxon Art And Thought

byBarbara C. Raw

Paperback | November 2, 2006

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This book is a study of the theology of the Trinity as expressed in the literature and art of the late Anglo-Saxon period. It examines the meaning of the representations of the Trinity in tenth- and eleventh-century English manuscripts and their relationship both to Anglo-Saxon theology and to earlier debates about the legitimacy of representations of the divine. The book's unifying theme is that of the image. It will be of interest to art historians, theologians and literary scholars alike.
Title:Trinity And Incarnation In Anglo-saxon Art And ThoughtFormat:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:November 2, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521030498

ISBN - 13:9780521030496

Reviews

Table of Contents

List of plates; Acknowledgements; List of abbreviations and note on the text; Introduction; 1. 'At this time which is the ending of the world'; 2. 'If anyone wishes to be saved'; 3. God made visible; 4. Signs and images; 5. God in history; 6. Christ, the icon of God; 7. Symbols of the divine; 8. Art, prayer and the vision of God; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Raw makes accessible some problems of the fundamentally theological surviving visual arts of late Anglo-Saxon England, placing them against selected Old English literary...Those elements, along with the translations of Latin citations into English, helpful footnotes, and Raw's proficient summaries of centuries of Christian thought, mark her book as an immensely serviceable introduction to tough interperatative problems in the Anglo-Saxon period." Speculum-a Jrnl Of Medieval Studies Oct 2001