True to Life: Twenty-Five Years of Conversations with David Hockney by Lawrence WeschlerTrue to Life: Twenty-Five Years of Conversations with David Hockney by Lawrence Weschler

True to Life: Twenty-Five Years of Conversations with David Hockney

byLawrence Weschler

Paperback | January 26, 2009

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Soon after the book's publication in 1982, artist David Hockney read Lawrence Weschler's Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees: A Life of Contemporary Artist Robert Irwin and invited Weschler to his studio to discuss it, initiating a series of engrossing dialogues, gathered here for the first time. Weschler chronicles Hockney's protean production and speculations, including his scenic designs for opera, his homemade xerographic prints, his exploration of physics in relation to Chinese landscape painting, his investigations into optical devices, his taking up of watercolor—and then his spectacular return to oil painting, around 2005, with a series of landscapes of the East Yorkshire countryside of his youth. These conversations provide an astonishing record of what has been Hockney's grand endeavor, nothing less than an exploration of "the structure of seeing" itself.
Lawrence Weschler, a staff writer for twenty years at the New Yorker, is the Director of the New York Institute of the Humanities at New York University and Artistic Director of the Chicago Humanities Festival.
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Title:True to Life: Twenty-Five Years of Conversations with David HockneyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 8 × 6 × 0.78 inPublished:January 26, 2009Publisher:University of California PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0520258797

ISBN - 13:9780520258792

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“‘Seeing Is Forgetting’ and ‘True to Life’ are not only about the artists talking to Weschler or, through him, to each other; they're about the artists talking to themselves.”