Turned Inside Out: Recollections Of A Private Soldier In The Army Of The Potomac by Frank WilkesonTurned Inside Out: Recollections Of A Private Soldier In The Army Of The Potomac by Frank Wilkeson

Turned Inside Out: Recollections Of A Private Soldier In The Army Of The Potomac

byFrank WilkesonIntroduction byJames M. McPherson

Paperback | October 1, 1997

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This memoir is no misty-eyed bit of nostalgia. Frank Wilkeson writes, he tells us, because "the history of the fighting to suppress the slave holders’ rebellion, thus far written, has been the work of commanding generals. The private soldiers who won the battles, and lost them through the ignorance and incapacity of commanders, have scarcely begun to write the history from their point of view."
 
Wilkeson’s is a firsthand account of the fumbles and near-cowardice of the commanders, of their squandering of opportunity, materiel, and human life; yet it also portrays foolishness, cupidity, recklessness, and sloth in the ranks. Wilkeson believes stoutly in the virtues of private soldiers who enlisted early in the war; he has a jaundiced eye for the bounty-hunter, conscript, immigrant, and Johnny-come-lately soldiers of the 1864 army. Nor does he cover the battlefield with the haze of glory; he writes frankly and directly of the scenes of death and mutilation, of battlegrounds covered with dead and dying men and animals in the hot summer sun.
James M. McPherson is a historian on the faculty of Princeton University. His many books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which won a Pulitzer Prize in 1989.
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Title:Turned Inside Out: Recollections Of A Private Soldier In The Army Of The PotomacFormat:PaperbackDimensions:246 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:October 1, 1997Publisher:UNP - Nebraska Paperback

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803297998

ISBN - 13:9780803297999

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Reviews

From Our Editors

This memoir is no misty-eyed bit of nostalgia. Frank Wilkeson writes, he tells us, because "the history of the fighting to suppress the slave holders' rebellion, thus far written, has been the work of commanding generals. The private soldiers who won the battles and lost them through the ignorance and incapacity of commanders, have scarcely begun to write the history from their point of view". Wilkeson's is a firsthand account of the fumbles and near-cowardice of the commanders, of their squandering of opportunity, materiel, and human life; yet it also portrays foolishness, cupidity, recklessness, and sloth in the ranks. Wilkeson believes stoutly in the virtues of private soldiers who enlisted early in the war; he has a jaundiced eye for the bounty-hunter, conscript, immigrant, and Johnny-come-lately soldiers of the 1864 army. Nor does he cover the battlefield with the haze of glory; he writes frankly and directly of the scenes of death and mutilation, of battlegrounds covered with dead and dying men and animals in the hot summer sun

Editorial Reviews

"Wilkeson’s memoirs are unlike most others by Civil War veterans, who tended to romanticize and sometimes to glorify their experiences, thus distorting the experiences they went through. . . . His emphasis on the seamy, unheroic, horrific side of war is a healthy corrective to romanticism."—James M. McPherson
- James M. McPherson