Turtles All The Way Down by John GreenTurtles All The Way Down by John Green

Turtles All The Way Down

byJohn Green

Hardcover | October 10, 2017

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about

“Wrenching and revelatory.” An instant #1 bestseller, the widely acclaimed Turtles All the Way Down is John Green's brilliant and shattering new novel.

“A tender story about learning to cope when the world feels out of control.” – People


Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis.
   
Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. 
 
In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.
John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan), and The Fault in Our Stars. His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize...
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Title:Turtles All The Way DownFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 8.56 × 6 × 1.13 inPublished:October 10, 2017Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0525555366

ISBN - 13:9780525555360

Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from John Green This was a massive let down and not worth your time.
Date published: 2018-07-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love love love Such an interesting read! Turned out to be one of those books you tell all your friends about. Couldn't put this book down!
Date published: 2018-07-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from John Let's Talk What I really enjoyed about the novel was how John Green described and demonstrated Mental Health. It was finally great to see honesty on paper, however the ending didn't live up to the greatness of the rest of the book. It felt rushed, and brushed off. Would of loved to get a better understanding on Aza's mental health journey instead of giving readers what they wanted or expected to read. Overall, the book was simple, easy to read and had a pretty great storyline. If you enjoyed Green's other novels you'll enjoy this one as well.
Date published: 2018-07-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth the Read Reading about Aza's story and her mental health struggles was reassuring as someone who struggles with this as well. John was somehow able to put the overthinking, unavoidable, indescribable feelings of anxiety into words on a page. The book touches on friendship, relationships, and family all from the perspective of someone who is struggling with their mental health. It was refreshing to read and not feel alone in those feelings.
Date published: 2018-07-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! & raw. John Green has done it again. I loved Aza's story.
Date published: 2018-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Accurate and honest and wonderful John Green somehow has put what it's like to have anxiety down on the page. How. This is amazing. As someone who has struggled with anxiety my whole life, I am so grateful for this book. I feel that the portrayal in Aza is honest yet unbiased. Her inner struggles are very real and when compared to the world she faces around her, even more so compelling. Her relationship with Davis is somehow innocent yet coming of age. The themes of identity and mental illness are beautiful and empowering, yet self aware. I continue in awe at John Green's insightful writing.
Date published: 2018-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of Green's best Thank you John Green, thank you so much for Turtles. While TFIOS remains my favorite of John's works, this is by far the most important. I have not connected with a character like I did with Aza in a very long time. This story captures what it is like for so many who live with mental illness, and was done so in such a beautiful way. I re-read the last 2 pages 5 times finishing this book, and I know when things are hard I will read them again for comfort. We had a long wait after TFIOS for John's next book, but damn was that wait worth it.
Date published: 2018-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Oh My Goodness Book hangover material right here. I was unsure of what it would be like when I read the description and wasn't sure that I'd like it all that much, but I read it because I love John Green. I'm so happy I decided to pick it up because it's so much more than the description and his portrayal of his main character was fantastic. I just felt happy and love and peace and hope and all that once I finished the last page and it was amazing to feel. Such a great read!
Date published: 2018-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A John Green Classic Personally, I found this book both intriguing and devastating - mainly because of the way Green is able to immerse the his reader into the thoughts of his characters. Definitely worth the read!
Date published: 2018-06-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from eh This John Green book seemed to be lacking the desire to keep reading that his other books have, still an okay read dealing with issues regarding mental health
Date published: 2018-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A peek into anxiety This is the first book I've read that I felt like I was reading about my own anxiety. John Green does an excellent job of capturing what it's like to be stuck in your head, riddled with anxiety and unable to fully explain it. Anxiety can be debilitating and very hard to explain. Unless you've experienced it yourself, I can see how it would be hard to relate to the main character, Aza. Take it as a learning opportunity. Anxiety is a mental illness, hard to diagnose and harder for sufferers and their loved ones to deal with. This gives a small window into just how complex anxiety is.
Date published: 2018-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Book, Great Message ! AMAZING!!! I read this for my own enjoyment and now will be using it within my classroom for a novel study !!! #plumreview
Date published: 2018-06-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I didn't LOVE LOVE it It honestly took me a while to even pick up this book even though I pre-ordered it and when I did pick it up and started reading, it took me a loOOonger while to pick it up again. This book has been very very anticipated since it is John's first book in 5 years. It was good and I love that it was an owned voice story, The plot the felt a litltle shotty to me but it was a good read.
Date published: 2018-06-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It was okay I read this book quickly. It was a typical John Green read, which I usually love, but I found it lacked something.
Date published: 2018-05-30
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not sure Note sure about this one. I was so excited to read a new one by John Green and it just didn't do it for me. I really loved how he put the anxiety in the book I thought it was nicely done.
Date published: 2018-05-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Meh Honestly, I love John Green's work but this book didn't really do it for me. I found myself kind of bored reading this and it didn't really keep me on the edge of my seat.
Date published: 2018-05-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Reading this with my teen daughter I'm reading this with my teen daughter, and she's enjoying it. It does a fine job of dealing with unusual situations of teenage angst (OCD, absent parents, too much/not enough money, romance). Nice way to show how real these issues can be, and the upside of having "present" parents. :)
Date published: 2018-05-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love John Green All of John Green's books are worth reading, including this one! Captivating and well written.
Date published: 2018-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from John Green is back As someone who follwos John Green's youtube channel I could really hear him in this book. He poured his heart and soul into it and it shows.
Date published: 2018-05-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Okay I love John Green but I wasn't loving this new book of his. I will still read anything he writes!
Date published: 2018-04-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing! My friend got me this book as a gift and I'm so glad that she did. The story is very interesting, and even if the main character can be a little annoying at some points, the story still was quite realistic in terms of mental health. #plumreview
Date published: 2018-04-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing John Green is an amazing author in general, and this is a great book of his. It let's you inside the mind of a teen who is struggling with mental illness; something people who don't have mental illnesses may find interesting, and people with certain mental illnesses find hits home. It's rare I see this train of thought in writing, as it's similar to my thoughts. Although that's a good thing, it's also slightly panic inducing, so be prepared.
Date published: 2018-04-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of John Green's best Never have I felt more understood in a book, I would highly recommend this book to anyone, teen to adult.
Date published: 2018-04-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Emotional story about mental health “I’m stuck in my head so much, but imagine being actually stuck inside my head with no way out, with no way to ever take a break from it, because that’s my life.” John Green eloquently handles the important subject of mental illness in his latest novel Turtles All the Way Down. His precision and attention to detail ensures that his fifth young adult novel will stand out from the crowd. Turtles All The Way Down follows the story of sixteen-year-old Aza Holmes who struggles with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and an anxiety disorder. She’s trying to manage her life in high school alongside her best friend Daisy, when she finds out that her childhood best friend Davis Pickett’s father, Russell Picket has gone missing. Daisy is convinced that the girls have a shot at the cash reward of one-hundred-thousand dollars that’s being offered for information. She quickly persuades Aza to reconnect with Davis, thus beginning their search for clues about Russell Picket. On first look, the plot of the missing billionaire seems to be what drives the story. It brings the characters together, particularly rekindling the relationship between Aza and Davis. However, the detective element of the story takes a bit of a back seat to allow for a look into Aza’s thoughts and how she lives her life. The story’s focus is more about her complex relationship with mental illness, but also how she develops through it, and copes with her anxiety and OCD. The book is very character based because of this direction. Aza’s really well developed character makes it easy to feel like you’re living inside her head; her perspective comes naturally to the reader. She’s speculative and constantly curious. Other aspects of the story, such as her mental illness, asks readers to be compassionate towards Aza. Her mental illness doesn’t always allow her the capacity to care for her family and friends in the way she wants; in the end, she is a very self-absorbed character. At her heart, Aza has a caring personality and is eager to love. She wants a lot out of her life, but she doesn’t know how to live that way in the midst of dealing with very crippling mental illnesses. Right from the beginning, it's evident that Daisy and Aza have a very close friendship. They have been friends since their childhood, so naturally there is a lot of trust, history, and love in their friendship. Daisy plays the role of sidekick to Aza’s role of a ‘hero’, as they try to solve the mystery. Her friendship with Daisy also allows Aza to find a coping method and outlet for her mental illnesses. Their conversations are the window through which the reader is able to have an inside look at Aza’s thoughts. The novel takes a look at how a mental health diagnosis can affect your life, as well as the people around you. Daisy tells Aza, “you’re slightly tortured, and the way you're tortured is sometimes also painful for, like, everyone around you.” Additionally, the romance that forms between Aza and Davis is delicately written. John Green is careful to not romanticize Aza’s condition. There is a perfect balance between the different aspects of the story, such that the romance doesn’t distract from the bigger focuses such as the missing billionaire, and Aza’s internal struggles. Throughout the book, John Green uses vivid descriptions of Aza’s experiences with OCD and anxiety such as this: “I knew what it was like to be in a feeling, to be not just surrounded by it but also permeated by it, the way my grandmother talked about God being everywhere. When my thoughts spiraled, I was in the spiral, and of it.” Mental health is a recurring aspect of the book because it is such a huge part of Aza’s life. It’s blaring and in-your-face. You can’t ignore it, because Aza can’t ignore it. Aza’s OCD and anxiety often take the form of compulsive thoughts, which sometimes lead her to compulsive actions. For example, Aza is constantly worrying about acquiring a fatal disease called Clostridium difficile. This intrusive thought pattern makes her paranoid about an open cut on her finger, which lead her to repeatedly discharge the wound and clean it. More often than not, the descriptions of Aza’s mental illnesses are unflinchingly honest and can be brutal to read. John describes Aza’s intrusive thinking as a thought spiral, perfectly capturing how she easily becomes so lost inside of herself. The vivid descriptions can be uncomfortable, but the important subject matter makes it worth it. Turtles All The Way Down deserves high praise for bravely showcasing the nitty-gritty details and ultimate reality of living with a mental illness. Unlike how OCD is presented in other books and films, John Green focuses more on how mental illnesses can affect thinking and attitudes, rather than physical compulsions. It confronts stereotypes and misconceptions such as ‘all people with OCD wash their hands three times before going to bed.’ It shows that mental illnesses can look different for each person, and challenges its audience to continue learning about mental health. It’s also important to note that John Green himself has OCD, which makes the descriptions of the illness seem more realistic. As with any John Green book, the writing style is full of philosophical thoughts and is decorated with metaphors. Green carefully walks the tightrope of creating intelligent characters, without seeming superfluous. He showcases his own abstract ideas about humanity through Aza in a way that complements Aza’s inquisitive and analytical brain. He writes about life and the way we live it with such clarity. He’s instantly relatable to any teenager that has ever struggled with a mental illness or claiming a self identity. He has the rare ability to put into words what humans spend so much time trying to understand. Aza is a delightful character to spend time with for the duration of the novel. She has so many lessons to learn, and it’s truly wonderful to learn them with her, and watch her character grow as the novel progresses.
Date published: 2018-04-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read! I bought this book a month ago and I am so happy that I did! It was a great read and left you on the edge of your seat. John Green did an amazing job on this book!
Date published: 2018-04-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really great book John Green is a talented author. This book was fun to read and was a great story. Would recommend this book.
Date published: 2018-04-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It was a good book The book starts off really slow, but it's good. It took me about half the book to get really into it, but once I did, I really enjoyed it. I will say, don't read it if you're feeling anxious, because it could amplify that (I was having a rough day and I was reading it, and the main character has anxiety and stuff, and it didn't help mine it the time).
Date published: 2018-03-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from not my typical choice this was not my typical choice but it was a good read
Date published: 2018-03-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Really enjoyed this book What an amazing insight to a young person struggling with mental illness. And a great story for all ages!
Date published: 2018-03-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love this book so much! Probably one of my favourite books ever! Loved the mystery, even though I don't typically like mystery books. I truly fell in love with these characters!
Date published: 2018-03-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent! As usual, John Green did not disappoint. I particularly loved the vivid, engrossing descriptions of the obsessive and compulsive patterns of Aza's thoughts. Great insight into living with OCD. An important book for multiple reasons, this being the main one for me personally.
Date published: 2018-03-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read! My daughter loved this book so much after reading her friend's copy that she requested a copy for herself. She's read it 2-3 times since!
Date published: 2018-03-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from So. Good. Hands down my favourite John Green novel. I was expecting a story line that was similar to all the other books he's written, but this one was unique in its own way and didn't disappoint! Being an animal nerd, I also quite enjoyed the inclusion of the tuatara in the story :)
Date published: 2018-03-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not my favourite John Green novel I didn't have high hopes for this book, and after reading it I still wasn't that impressed. It was good to have a protagonist that some readers could relate to but I found her really annoying and just not interesting, so that already put me off having to read the story through her eyes. The storyline itself was pretty weak as well.
Date published: 2018-03-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very complex and interesting! I was a little hesitant to read this at first but it was actually pretty good.
Date published: 2018-03-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from made me tear up hands down john green's best novel aza was such an important protagonist and i loved her voice. hearing her struggles and thoughts made me cry. she's a very relatable mc and i love how personal this story is to john green as well. there's some mystery & some romance, but all in all it's about aza and how she deals with what's going on in her life & her mental illness, which i really appreciated!
Date published: 2018-03-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Aside from TFIOS, My Favourite. I was actually very surprised by this book. I avoided reading it for a while because I thought it would be Mystery Heavy, centering around the disappearance of a shady Billionaire; this did not seem appealing to me, but it was John Green, and relatively short at 280ish pages. However, the story actually focuses less on the Mystery, and more on the relationship which forms between the Billionaires son and Aza, the books narrator. The book is also about how Aza deals with her invasive health related thoughts; she becomes anxious because she believes her health is at risk. Sometimes these thoughts will interrupt the flow of the story, but not without purpose. Certainly, read this book. It won't make you cry like TFIOS, but,you can still feel some feels.
Date published: 2018-03-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read this book! How can John Green books get any better? There is no rhyme or reason to his genius. In true John Green style, this book was phenomenal. If I was still teaching my Children's Literature course, this book would definitely be on the reading list. Turtles All the Way Down gives the reader an inside view into the OCD mind of the main character, Aza. As usual, the character development in this novel is outstanding. Aza, the main character, is the focus but the supporting cast of characters including Daisy, Davis, and Aza's mum are equally wonderful. Written in first person, we are witnesses to Aza's ongoing struggles, her despair and truimph. Green incorporates so much in this little book. The struggles of living with a mental illness. Teens coping with the loss of a parent. A mother's fears of losing her daughter. And a mystery that is solved in the end. And, to top it off, Green also weaves his extreme love of both art and science into this novel. For such a short book, it truly has everything and is wrapped up in a wonderful package. Take this ride through a range of emotions that equals the power of The Fault in Our Stars. You won't be disappointed!
Date published: 2018-03-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read this book! How can John Green books get any better? There is no rhyme or reason to his genius. In true John Green style, this book was phenomenal. If I was still teaching my Children's Literature course, this book would definitely be on the reading list. Turtles All the Way Down gives the reader an inside view into the OCD mind of the main character, Aza. As usual, the character development in this novel is outstanding. Aza, the main character, is the focus but the supporting cast of characters including Daisy, Davis, and Aza's mum are equally wonderful. Written in first person, we are witnesses to Aza's ongoing struggles, her despair and truimph. Green incorporates so much in this little book. The struggles of living with a mental illness. Teens coping with the loss of a parent. A mother's fears of losing her daughter. And a mystery that is solved in the end. And, to top it off, Green also weaves his extreme love of both art and science into this novel. For such a short book, it truly has everything and is wrapped up in a wonderful package. Take this ride through a range of emotions that equals the power of The Fault in Our Stars. You won't be disappointed!
Date published: 2018-03-15
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Just ok This book was a little to drawn out for my liking.
Date published: 2018-03-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from WOW!! WOW!! The writing was amazing and not only was it an amazing plot, but you also learn so much, it's kind of an educational novel.
Date published: 2018-03-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from John Greens Best Book Yet. This story goes in a completely different direction then I expected it too, but it's unique cast of characters made up for it.
Date published: 2018-03-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from wonderful John Green did a fantastic job once again. Turtles All The Way Down was a great read, that was filled with so many amazing quotes. John Green is an extraordinary writer.
Date published: 2018-03-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Way to go John Green! Green never fails to make me fall for his books. I have never been disappointed with his work! I’ve been waiting patiently for him to release a new novel and this really impressed me!
Date published: 2018-02-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Turtles All the Way Up This book was enjoyable to read. The descriptions of mental illness felt very true. I would recommend this to teens, or adults looking for a youth's perspective.
Date published: 2018-02-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Better than the Title thought it was going to be bad but ended up really good, John Green comes throughhhh
Date published: 2018-02-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sad but beautiful I didn't think I could like a John Green book more than I love An Abundance of Katherines but this could do it
Date published: 2018-02-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing I loved this book so much! The characters were so unique and the mental health aspect was not stereotypical at all, it gave such great depth to the whole plot and you should definitely pick this book up!
Date published: 2018-02-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this book i pre-ordered this book hoping it would be as good as John Green's other books and i wasn't dispointed I loved it
Date published: 2018-02-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Turtles all the Way Down A page turner like all of John Green's books. I really enjoyed the mental health aspect of the writing. Warning, if you suffer from anxiety you may have to put the book down at some points as it may hit close to home. #plumreview
Date published: 2018-02-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read I read this as an adult, even though it's a young adult novel and I loved the story so much, great ending
Date published: 2018-02-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Mental Health view of Anxiety Pretty good overall - I think his other novels are better
Date published: 2018-02-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Okay Not Green's best work, but was overall pretty good at voicing anxiety. Makes you rethink the little things overlooked in life. However many parts felt way too forced/philosophical in the way that is beyond how normal teenage characters talk. They were too witty for regular 16-year-olds. Overall satisfactory read, could have tied the ending up better though.
Date published: 2018-02-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from absorbing This was a shared Christmas book between my friend and I. Turtles had me "hook, line and sinker" as the saying goes from the first page: "...I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell. Of course, you pretend to be the author". How could you not continue to read on!!! Written honestly with a sensitivity that gleans information in such an empathic manner. I'd recommend this novel as required reading.
Date published: 2018-02-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I thought it was really good I loved it right from the start. I never thought I could relate so much to a character (and trust me I can relate to a lot) but this one was different. I saw a lot of myself in Aza and it honestly shocked me! It wasn't what I thought it was going to be but it blew me away!
Date published: 2018-02-13
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Self-insert pretentious novel with a few decent parts This book is great for mental health representation, showing therapy, learning about a new animal, etc. This book was about about not doing enough to fight the perception that medication can help - the main character was very against medication and while it was mentioned that meds can help, I don't feel it was empathized enough. This was my first John Green book, having avoided the others previously as I predicted he was a pretentious English Major author. However this book sounded interesting and the first two chapters got me hooked. In the end I was right and I didn't end up liking this book. It was too pretentious with the writing and how teens apparently talk. Also the poem thing which allowed JG to shove a bunch of literary references in his novel. Of which I knew exactly 0. And the beat your head a billion times with the moral of the story writing. I just couldn't get into the story. Finally, the solution of the mystery didn't make any sense.
Date published: 2018-02-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from great characters A heart wrenchingly real characters, and a beautiful window in their minds.
Date published: 2018-02-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Phenomenal I got this as a Christmas gift and it was an instant attention grabber. I loved the story and found it very easy to relate to the characters. If you suffer from mental disorders or like to learn more, this book is very insightful. John Green never fails to write incredible stories.
Date published: 2018-02-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Mostly okay Not my favourite of John Green's novels. Not terrible, but not fantastic either as some of his others have been.
Date published: 2018-02-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from good message You can tell what message John Green was trying to get across
Date published: 2018-02-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from One of John Green's best books I have liked a few of John Greens books, but overall this was one of my favourites! It really hits the nail on the head when it comes to OCD. I can't wait to see what else this author has in store for us.
Date published: 2018-02-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of John Green's Best Incredible for anyone dealing with mental health issues or even if you're not - wonderfully insightful.
Date published: 2018-02-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Expected More I think I expected more than what I got. Not bad, but still prefer TFIOS.
Date published: 2018-02-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from So amazing! This is now my favourite John Green book. It was so beautifully written. John Green really has a talent for finding the perfect metaphor to convey a certain feeling. Its representation of mental health is done amazingly and is so important.
Date published: 2018-02-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My First John Green I enjoyed this book, not as I usually enjoy a book. At first it was like, oh this is boring and then it was "Bell Let's Talk" mental week and I listened to talks and read comments and papers and articles. "Nobody gets anybody else, not really. We are all stuck inside ourselves" - John Green Although we don't want to talk about, we all have mental health problems. May be small, maybe big. Most of us are just better at pulling out of the spiral very quickly and calmly than others. Turtles all the Way Down is a glimpse into the everyday life of Aza Holmes who is struggling with her mental health and hoping that someday she will have a "Normal Life" but then again, what is Normal?
Date published: 2018-02-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing... As Always John Green is Amazing!!! Love all his books/stories
Date published: 2018-02-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from John Green does it again I'm not sure how John Green is able to get inside the head of a teenage girl, but he does a fantastic job! The depiction of a young girl with deep mental health concerns, just trying to get through daily life, is magnificent. Not sure about anyone else, but the reveal of the title in the book really made me think.
Date published: 2018-02-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Pretty Good It was slow at first but sped up. John Green never disappoints.
Date published: 2018-02-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Would recommend Easy and quick read that accurately depicts anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder.
Date published: 2018-02-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great!! Wonderful though provoking ...so relevant today....
Date published: 2018-02-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing Work Aza's anxiety was very well portrayed, in my opinion, and I definitely feel this was an important read.
Date published: 2018-02-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from INCREDIBLE My heart aches for the main character and her mental illness. John Green does an excellent job at opening the readers' eyes to what mental illness feels like. A beautiful ending; one that I read multiple times and cried over. A MUST READ.
Date published: 2018-02-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from havent read yet Havent ready yet, was recommended by a friend. heard it is very well and reviews look good too
Date published: 2018-02-02
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Very good depiction of mental illness. I cannot say I enjoyed this book. It was well written in the way it shows mental illness. The character's mental illness overtakes the plot of the central mystery and love story, which I suppose was the point, but does not make for a very fun read.
Date published: 2018-02-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Thoughtful YA After a long wait, we finally get a new John Green novel! It's clear that Green has learned from the "Greenisms" that bogged down An Abundance of Katherines and Paper Towns. I really enjoyed the treatment of OCD and anxiety, which are so rarely well conveyed.
Date published: 2018-01-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read! Profound writing as always with John Green books. This was interesting and was from the POV of a teenage girl with anxiety problems and I think it shewn a light on this mental health issue that alot of people have trouble understanding
Date published: 2018-01-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Was way too hyped up. I am a pretty big fan of John Green. I have read majority of his books and have enjoyed majority. This one was good, but not the best. There were parts that were good and parts that were a little boring. I really like Aza's character development and I feel like I could really relate to her. The book was pretty sad though. I feel like the ending could have been a lot better as well. I didn't hate the book, but it isn't one of my favourites.
Date published: 2018-01-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good, but not his best work Good writing, quick read, however I was expecting more.
Date published: 2018-01-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from First-time John Green Reader - Love this book I have never read a John Green book but I can say that I loved this book. I am 25 years old, so a bit past YA as a genre typically, but the storyline didn't feel juvenile. In fact, take John's characters out of high school and they'd fit into any university and workplace. I particularly enjoyed his protagonist and her journey through mental health issues. Touching read, all in all.
Date published: 2018-01-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from YASSSSS THIS IS THE REAL JOHN GREEN BOOK READDDD LOVE CRY LAUGH ENJOY UGH I LOVE THIS BRILLAINT GENUIS IN THE FORM OF A GREAT MAN
Date published: 2018-01-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I love John Green, but... Not one of my favourites. Some good lines, but it just felt different from his other work.
Date published: 2018-01-25
Rated 2 out of 5 by from typical YA typical john green, poor character development, targeting teen market
Date published: 2018-01-25
Rated 2 out of 5 by from typical YA typical john green, poor character development, targeting teen market
Date published: 2018-01-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Sweet and honest. It's obvious when you read his writing that John Green has never forgotten what it's like to be a teenager. But more than that, feeling lost or uncomfortable in your own skin is just part of being human more than an anomaly. His words are really heartfelt without being sappy and his stories are real without being overly dramatic or contrived.
Date published: 2018-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from John Green's newest book is heart! Great read. Highly recommended. Nice new work by John Green.
Date published: 2018-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from What an interesting book! I loved how the author brought a new light to OCD and anxiety. It gave me a new perspective. Nice and light read while still remaining informative. The plot that was built up at the start of the book was kinda lost by the end. By the end, the 'plot' felt like a loose end he just wrapped up. It was as if the plot was there in order to give a reason for the characters to exist and interact.
Date published: 2018-01-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very Powerful! This was the first book I have read by John Green. I was impressed with how real his main character seemed. It helped me to understand better what it is like to live with a mental illness. I will definitely be reading more books by John Green!
Date published: 2018-01-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great characters. John Green always does a phenomenal job with his characters. They are always funny, witty and down to earth, making it such an enjoyable read.
Date published: 2018-01-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Meh The plot was too slow and a bit boring at times. However, I really related to to main character and the physical and mental aspect of anxiety.
Date published: 2018-01-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Nice flow to the story. keeps you intrigued
Date published: 2018-01-19
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Eh I was never a fan of the Green brothers. This book reenforced that. Weak plot, weak characters. Just eh. Defines the YA books of this time. But still a page turner
Date published: 2018-01-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read It was interesting how Green approached the topic of OCD and how it could potentially rule one's life, but also how one can overcome it eventually. I enjoyed the storyline and it was a cute book, but I did feel as though the story only changed after I finished reading a third of the book. It was nice, but I wish it was longer.
Date published: 2018-01-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from yes The story flows so effortlessly and it has so much originality
Date published: 2018-01-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My favourite book! Though this book is slow paced and not very plot based, I loved it. As someone with an anxiety disorder, I really related to the main characters experiences.
Date published: 2018-01-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nothing Special, but a nice read Nothing too crazy or worth mentioning, but if you're looking for something that you can keep on your shelf and reread from time to time, this is it. Its nice.
Date published: 2018-01-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating look at OCD Loved this introspective novel, but it is unfortunate that it was marketed as being a hunt for a lost millionaire, rather than the coming of age story it is. I would highly recommend this book for fans of his writing - if you haven't enjoyed his writing before now, you still won't.
Date published: 2018-01-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from brilliant insights into someone else's mind As an adult reader, this book felt more like a Young Adult novel to me than TFIOS did, and for that reason I enjoyed it less. But more importantly, I’m always grateful to authors who tackle mental health issues, who attempt to explain the unexplainable. Severe anxiety is not a challenge I've faced in my own life but I hope reading books like this will help me be more understanding.
Date published: 2018-01-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read Although I did not enjoy it as much as The Fault in Our Stars, it was a good read!
Date published: 2018-01-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Did not disappoint I counted down the days until I received my copy being a hard core John Green fan! As always he blows me away with some of his simple yet insightful lines that I will probably later get tattooed on me. Engaging characters, cute story and as always, you pause and learn a little something about humanity.
Date published: 2018-01-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Your Typical John Green Book From reading many of his other books, I found this one to be somewhat more elementary. I was still immersed in it as much as the other ones because it is so easy to read, however, I found personally that I enjoyed his other works more. Still an AMAZING book, definitely read!
Date published: 2018-01-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok A friend recommended this to me, and it was wonderful!
Date published: 2018-01-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from SO GOOD! This book is amazing. At first the book goes into great detail and is better every chapter. A great read!
Date published: 2018-01-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Funny I've read most of his work and I have to say, this is my favourite. He is amazing at writing in a female point of view. And though I did not love all of his books, I must say I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Date published: 2018-01-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Alright book. I am a huge John Green fan, and this book was good. It captured mental illness perfectly in glimpses but also felt a little too try hard. Overall, worth the read, but many of his other books fall ahead of this one in my opinion.
Date published: 2018-01-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from great read interesting and captivating. finally a john green book that doesn't make you ball your eyes out
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Could be better This is a quick read with some interesting insights about OCD, but the plot is almost non-existent.
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing and beautiful book I bought this just after Christmas and once I started reading it I wasn't able to put it down (I managed to finish the whole book in just one night. John Green did an amazing job at avoiding the romanticization of mental health disorders. He depicted the relationship of Aza and Davis in a realistic way, taking into consideration the circumstances. Throughout the book, we see Aza's growth and development of strength as well and herself beginning to accept her disorder. The major plot of the disappearance of Davis' father was slightly unneccesary, but I think it also brought forth a valid reason for Aza and Davis to rekindle their connection with eachother. Overrall, the story was beautiful and realistic. John Green is certainly one of my go to authors.
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok everyone had been telling me to pick this book up, and I had super high expectations. However, when I actually read it, I realized it was NOT worth it
Date published: 2018-01-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok everyone had been telling me to pick this book up, and I had super high expectations. However, when I actually read it, I realized it was NOT worth it
Date published: 2018-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Relevant and Informative Turtles All the Way Down (TATWD) isn't a traditional love story, but a story about mental illness and dealing with ever-tightening thought spirals, while going through high school (and all it's drama). TATWD is an important novel to read as it opens one's eyes to the life of an individual struggling with a mental illness, in this case, OCD, without sugar coating (much at all), and without being over dramatic. John Green''s descriptions of Aza's thoughts and thought spirals were incredible.
Date published: 2018-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! "-and I kept thinking about how the sky is a singular noun, as if it's one thing. But the sky isn't one thing. The sky is everything." When I put this book down, I cried a thousand tears. #plumreview
Date published: 2018-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Another great book by John Green Always amazed at how well his books are written. I didn't care for the plot, but I loved his description of Aza's thoughts and her struggle with OCD/anxiety.
Date published: 2018-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fav Author he never fails to write a good book!
Date published: 2018-01-04
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not the greatest! I liked the way John Green has decided to write about mental illness in his book. It felt real and not romanticized as mental illness is usually portrayed in books and movies etc. I just didn't care the "missing" aspect of the story and wish it was more about her struggles with her illness.
Date published: 2018-01-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I could have done without the "romantic" subplot
Date published: 2018-01-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great story! Great representation of mental illness and the plot is enlightening. Would read it again.
Date published: 2017-12-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from John Green wins me over again Ordered this book a few months ago and read it in a day. Possibly one of Green's best books in my opinion :)
Date published: 2017-12-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enlightening. If you are a sufferer of anxiety, Aza will make sense to you. Each of Aza's episodes were described in such immense detail... and he got all the details right. The sweating, the stomach pain, the spiralling thoughts. Sometimes when people describe mental illness they make their characters the victim but I found that John did the opposite. Aza, even though she would disagree, was defiantly a fighter (like most of us end up being without even realizing it). He brought attention to how every day tasks can feel like climbing mountains and how even though she was afraid she was also courageous. Even though life scared her she still woke up everyday and lived it. Overall great read and very relatable to those who have Aza's illness OR TO THOSE WHO WOULD LIKE TO UNDERSTAND IT. The only downside would be the begging of the book was very long and tedious. It picks up at Chapter 11. Also the ending was very rushed and abstract. I would've enjoyed to know where she ended up going for college.
Date published: 2017-12-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Love! Great edition for Green's oeuvre
Date published: 2017-12-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book was very difficult to get into
Date published: 2017-12-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great John Green is one of my favourite authors, so this review may be a tad biased, but this book was wonderful. I loved the exploration he took with mental health - it was refreshing and progressive.
Date published: 2017-12-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Perspective I received this book for Christmas and quickly finished it. I found that it gave a better perspective on OCD than many other teen fiction books. I think the secondary plot about the missing business man was unnecessary and that it should have focused on the main character and her struggles dealing with OCD and managing friendships and relationships, but overall I think it was better than a lot of Green's books. Definitely would read again even if it was slightly over hyped.
Date published: 2017-12-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome John Green! John Green is back at it! I had no idea what to expect when going into this, but loved it! Never seen mental health struggles portrayed so accurately! #plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a well thought written! can't wait to read it again! and to share with friends. Great talk!
Date published: 2017-12-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Slow but Good This novel definitely has a few pacing issues but it's still beautifully written. I can't say it lived up to the hype, but it was still a great book.
Date published: 2017-12-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved it to the ending. The ending was a bit too much, but I have hope that the series will be redeemed
Date published: 2017-12-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved it to the ending. The ending was a bit too much, but I have hope that the series will be redeemed
Date published: 2017-12-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I need to re-read this, as I rushed through it the first time because I was busy, but nonetheless, I enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-12-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I need to re-read this, as I rushed through it the first time because I was busy, but nonetheless, I enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-12-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from YES! John Green is one of my favourite authors, so this review may be a tad biased, but this book was wonderful. I loved the exploration he took with mental health - it was refreshing and progressive. It can read a little slow, but it is written so well.
Date published: 2017-12-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good I need to re-read this, as I rushed through it the first time because I was busy, but nonetheless, I enjoyed it. dftba
Date published: 2017-12-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Get out of my head! **spoiler alert** I waited most of 2017 for this book to come out. I counted hours, minutes, and seconds (with help from a wonderful website that literally had turtles all the way down) and now finally not only do I have this wonderful book, but I’ve read every single marking, front to back. It’s hard to tell if my judgments are biased because John wrote it, or because I can relate so closely to its main character, but needless to say my thoughts are this: Turtles All The Way Down is a beautiful work of art. In John's previous work, I always fell in love with the writing, because I felt like I was having a conversation with the main characters. It was so light, and easy to read, and intelligent, that I just fell into the story. That's how I fell in love with his writing, and reading in general: "slowly, and then all at once." But with TATWD, which I've come to pronounce as Tat-wad, it’s different. This book wasn't like a conversation; it was like I WAS “Aza ‘And Then Eventually You Die’ Holmes.” When she could not hear the conversations around her, because her knowledge of the human microbiota was drowning out the real word, I also could not partake in the conversations around her. It is a rare few books that make me feel like I've fallen this deep into a character, and so involuntarily. I was so frustrated with these thought spirals. I wanted to hear more about Mychal’s art or my best friends fan fic, but as Aza, I was forced to fret over whether I was a person, and whether that personhood was at risk of death by microbial invasion. The limited point of view with Aza, makes it all feel so real, and personal. This book shows you that “True terror isn’t being scared, it’s not having a choice in the matter.” I know it's been said already, but mental illness, at least in my experience, is very much like this. It doesn't allow you to choose between your inner dialogue and the real world, and no amount of words the outside world offers could ever quell the fears. Instead we learn therapies, and tactics that help make living with mental illness a little better. It is not heroic. It is not a superpower. But it is also nothing to be pitied or feared; it just is. John Green’s book does a marvelous job of demonstrating just that, while also keeping you anxiously turning each page to see what's next for Aza. Will she find her way up out of the wormhole or get lost within it? So what are you waiting for? Pick up the book, and find out for yourself. Seriously – go get the book now and read it, you will not be disappointed. For anyone suffering from mental illness, I strongly urge you to seek help if you haven’t, and to take the help you have sought out seriously, if you have. Remember not every counselor or therapist will be a fit for you, and that’s okay. Do your best to take care of yourself, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and take these beautiful words of wisdom from Aza’s mother: “Your now is not your forever.”
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ok read It was an okay read - there was so much hype that I was expecting amazing. It was okay
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok While I saw parts of the plot coming I was incredibly surprised by the ending.
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great loved everything about this
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved everything about this book!
Date published: 2017-12-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved everything about this book!
Date published: 2017-12-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING! This book was absolutely amazing!!!! The character depth was amazing and it really puts you in her mind and I think everyone needs to read this book.
Date published: 2017-12-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not bad the characters were well developed and the plot is ok, I would recommend it to read
Date published: 2017-12-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Must read! I had really high expectations for this book and it did not disappointment. It's the perfect John Green story, a story that if told by anyone other than Green it would probably not have been this great. I absolutely loved it. It presents and evokes such raw emotions and thoughts. Highly recommend. "True terror isn't being scared; it's not having a choice in the matter"
Date published: 2017-12-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heartbreaking And Hopeful Turtles All The Way Down is phenomenal! It's a story about living with mental illness (which is never romanticized or trivialized) and how it affects relationships. Written with Green's signature combination of wit and pathos, it's a triumphant return to writing.
Date published: 2017-12-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from amazing but not surprised i was lucky enough to get the last signed copy in store :) but before that, it was such a good read definatley will be picking it up in the future
Date published: 2017-12-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok good book- takes a while to get into but left me wanting to read the sequel!!!
Date published: 2017-12-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Such a good read Loved this story and the characters #Plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok good book- takes a while to get into but left me wanting to read the sequel!!!
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing Author Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome I've read many of John Greens books and I think this one is my favourite so far! #plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from so good I really loved the main character
Date published: 2017-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great! (As every book from John Green, frankly) While it is not as good as TFIOS (though I truly believe none could surpass this one), this book was enjoyable. Main character is endearing and the story is touching, which is why I do recommand it.
Date published: 2017-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good This was a good, quick read. Compelling characters. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-05
Rated 2 out of 5 by from ok not as good as better than alaska
Date published: 2017-12-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book consumed me. I lived in every word, and felt every feeling.
Date published: 2017-12-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book consumed me. I lived in every word, and felt every feeling.
Date published: 2017-12-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book consumed me. I lived in every word, and felt every feeling.
Date published: 2017-12-03

Read from the Book

ONEAt the time I first realized I might be fictional, my weekdays were spent at a publicly funded institution on the north side of Indianapolis called White River High School, where I was required to eat lunch at a particular time—between 12:37 p.m. and 1:14 p.m.—by forces so much larger than myself that I couldn’t even begin to identify them. If those forces had given me a different lunch period, or if the tablemates who helped author my fate had chosen a different topic of conversation that September day, I would’ve met a different end—or at least a different middle. But I was -beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell.Of course, you pretend to be the author. You have to. You think, I now choose to go to lunch, when that monotone beep rings from on high at 12:37. But really, the bell decides. You think you’re the painter, but you’re the canvas.Hundreds of voices were shouting over one another in the cafeteria, so that the conversation became mere sound, the rushing of a river over rocks. And as I sat beneath fluorescent cylinders spewing aggressively artificial light, I thought about how we all believed ourselves to be the hero of some personal epic, when in fact we were basically identical organisms colonizing a vast and windowless room that smelled of Lysol and lard.I was eating a peanut butter and honey sandwich and drinking a Dr Pepper. To be honest, I find the whole process of masticating plants and animals and then shoving them down my esophagus kind of disgusting, so I was trying not to think about the fact that I was eating, which is a form of thinking about it.Across the table from me, Mychal Turner was scribbling in a yellow-paper notebook. Our lunch table was like a long-running play on Broadway: The cast changed over the years, but the roles never did. Mychal was The Artsy One. He was talking with Daisy Ramirez, who’d played the role of my Best and Most Fearless Friend since elementary school, but I couldn’t follow their conversation over the noise of all the others.What was my part in this play? The Sidekick. I was Daisy’s Friend, or Ms. Holmes’s Daughter. I was somebody’s something.I felt my stomach begin to work on the sandwich, and even over everybody’s talking, I could hear it digesting, all the bacteria chewing the slime of peanut butter—the students inside of me eating at my internal cafeteria. A shiver convulsed through me.“Didn’t you go to camp with him?” Daisy asked me.“With who?”“Davis Pickett,” she said.“Yeah,” I said. “Why?”“Aren’t you listening?” Daisy asked. I am listening, I thought, to the cacophony of my digestive tract. Of course I’d long known that I was playing host to a massive collection of parasitic organisms, but I didn’t much like being reminded of it. By cell count, humans are approximately 50 percent microbial, meaning that about half of the cells that make you up are not yours at all. There are something like a thousand times more microbes living in my particular biome than there are human beings on earth, and it often seems like I can feel them living and breeding and dying in and on me. I wiped my sweaty palms on my jeans and tried to control my breathing. Admittedly, I have some anxiety problems, but I would argue it isn’t irrational to be concerned about the fact that you are a skin-encased bacterial colony.Mychal said, “His dad was about to be arrested for bribery or something, but the night before the raid he disappeared. There’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward out for him.”“And you know his kid,” Daisy said.“Knew him,” I answered.I watched Daisy attack her school-provided rectangular pizza and green beans with a fork. She kept glancing up at me, her eyes widening as if to say, Well ? I could tell she wanted me to ask her about something, but I couldn’t tell what, because my stomach wouldn’t shut up, which was forcing me deep inside a worry that I’d somehow contracted a parasitic infection.I could half hear Mychal telling Daisy about his new art project, in which he was using Photoshop to average the faces of a hundred people named Mychal, and the average of their faces would be this new, one-hundred-and-first Mychal, which was an interesting idea, and I wanted to listen, but the cafeteria was so loud, and I couldn’t stop wondering whether there was something wrong with the microbial balance of power inside me.Excessive abdominal noise is an uncommon, but not unprecedented, presenting symptom of infection with the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which can be fatal. I pulled out my phone and searched “human microbiome” to reread Wikipedia’s introduction to the trillions of microorganisms currently inside me. I clicked over to the article about C. diff, scrolling to the part about how most C. diff infections occur in hospitals. I scrolled down farther to a list of symptoms, none of which I had, except for the excessive abdominal noises, although I knew from previous searches that the Cleveland Clinic had reported the case of one person who’d died of C. diff after presenting at the hospital with only abdominal pain and fever. I reminded myself that I didn’t have a fever, and my self replied: You don’t have a fever YET.At the cafeteria, where a shrinking slice of my consciousness still resided, Daisy was telling Mychal that his averaging project shouldn’t be about people named Mychal but about imprisoned men who’d later been exonerated. “It’ll be easier, anyway,” she said, “because they all have mug shots taken from the same angle, and then it’s not just about names but about race and class and mass incarceration,” and Mychal was like, “You’re a genius, Daisy,” and she said, “You sound surprised,” and meanwhile I was thinking that if half the cells inside of you are not you, doesn’t that challenge the whole notion of me as a singular pronoun, let alone as the author of my fate? And I fell pretty far down that recursive wormhole until it transported me completely out of the White River High School cafeteria into some non-sensorial place only properly crazy people get to visit.Ever since I was little, I’ve pressed my right thumbnail into the finger pad of my middle finger, and so now there’s this weird callus over my fingerprint. After so many years of doing this, I can open up a crack in the skin really easily, so I cover it up with a Band-Aid to try to prevent infection. But sometimes I get worried that there already is an infection, and so I need to drain it, and the only way to do that is to reopen the wound and press out any blood that will come. Once I start thinking about splitting the skin apart, I literally cannot not do it. I apologize for the double negative, but it’s a real double negative of a situation, a bind from which negating the negation is truly the only escape. So anyway, I started to want to feel my thumbnail biting into the skin of my finger pad, and I knew that resistance was more or less futile, so beneath the cafeteria table, I slipped the Band-Aid off my finger and dug my thumbnail into the callused skin until I felt the crack open.“Holmesy,” Daisy said. I looked up at her. “We’re almost through lunch and you haven’t even mentioned my hair.” She shook out her hair, with so-red-they-were-pink highlights. Right. She’d dyed her hair.I swum up out of the depths and said, “It’s bold.”“I know, right? It says, ‘Ladies and gentlemen and also people who do not identify as ladies or gentlemen, Daisy Ramirez won’t break her promises, but she will break your heart.” Daisy’s self-proclaimed life motto was “Break Hearts, Not Promises.” She kept threatening to get it tattooed on her ankle when she turned eighteen. Daisy turned back to Mychal, and I to my thoughts. The stomach grumbling had grown, if anything, louder. I felt like I might vomit. For someone who actively dislikes bodily fluids, I throw up quite a lot.“Holmesy, you okay?” Daisy asked. I nodded. Sometimes I wondered why she liked me, or at least tolerated me. Why any of them did. Even I found myself annoying.I could feel sweat sprouting from my forehead, and once I begin to sweat, it’s impossible to stop. I’ll keep sweating for hours, and not just my face or my armpits. My neck sweats. My boobs sweat. My calves sweat. Maybe I did have a fever.Beneath the table, I slid the old Band-Aid into my pocket and, without looking, pulled out a new one, unwrapped it, and then glanced down to apply it to my finger. All the while, I was breathing in through my nose and out through my mouth, in the manner advised by Dr. Karen Singh, exhaling at a pace “that would make a candle flicker but not go out. Imagine that candle, Aza, flickering from your breath but still there, always there.” So I tried that, but the thought spiral kept tightening anyway. I could hear Dr. Singh saying I shouldn’t get out my phone, that I mustn’t look up the same questions over and over, but I got it out anyway, and reread the “Human Microbiota” Wikipedia article.The thing about a spiral is, if you follow it inward, it never actually ends. It just keeps tightening, infinitely.I sealed the Ziploc bag around the last quarter of my sandwich, got up, and tossed it into an overfilled trash can. I heard a voice from behind me. “How concerned should I be that you haven’t said more than two words in a row all day?”“Thought spiral,” I mumbled in reply. Daisy had known me since we were six, long enough to get it.“I figured. Sorry, man. Let’s hang out today.”This girl Molly walked up to us, smiling, and said, “Uh, Daisy, just FYI, your Kool-Aid dye job is staining your shirt.” Daisy looked down at her shoulders, and indeed, her striped top had turned pink in spots. She flinched for a second, then straightened her spine. “Yeah, it’s part of the look, Molly. Stained shirts are huge in Paris right now.” She turned away from Molly and said, “Right, so we’ll go to your house and watch Star Wars: Rebels.” Daisy was really into Star Wars—and not just the movies, but also the books and the animated shows and the kids’ show where they’re all made out of Lego. Like, she wrote fan fiction about Chewbacca’s love life. “And we will improve your mood until you are able to say three or even four words in a row; sound good?”“Sounds good.”“And then you can take me to work. Sorry, but I need a ride.”“Okay.” I wanted to say more, but the thoughts kept coming, unbidden and unwanted. If I’d been the author, I would’ve stopped thinking about my microbiome. I would’ve told Daisy how much I liked her idea for Mychal’s art project, and I would’ve told her that I did remember Davis Pickett, that I remembered being eleven and carrying a vague but constant fear. I would’ve told her that I remembered once at camp lying next to Davis on the edge of a dock, our legs dangling over, our backs against the rough-hewn planks of wood, staring together up at a cloudless summer sky. I would’ve told her that Davis and I never talked much, or even looked at each other, but it didn’t matter, because we were looking at the same sky together, which is maybe more intimate than eye contact anyway. Anybody can look at you. It’s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.

Editorial Reviews

A New York Times Notable Book • A New York Times Critics’ Top Book of the Year • An NPR Best Book of the Year • A TIME Best Book of the Year • A Wall Street Journal Best Book of the Year • A Boston Globe Best Book of the Year • An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year • A Seventeen Best Book of the Year • A Southern Living Best Book of the Year • A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year • A Booklist Editors' Choice Selection • A BookPage Best Book of the Year • An SLJ Best Book of the Year • An A.V. Club Best Book of the Year • A Bustle Best Book of the Year • A BuzzFeed Best Book of the Year • A Pop Sugar Best Book of the Year • A Vulture Best Book of the Year  #1 New York Times Bestseller • #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller • #1 International BestsellerFeatured on Fresh Air, Studio 360, Good Morning Amercia, The TODAY Show“This novel is by far [Green’s] most difficult to read. It’s also his most astonishing. . . . So surprising and moving and true that I became completely unstrung. . . . One needn’t be suffering like Aza to identify with it. One need only be human.”—The New York Times“A tender story about learning to cope when the world feels out of control.” – People“Green finds the language to describe the indescribable. . . . A must-read for those struggling with mental illness, or for their friends and family.” —San Francisco Chronicle“A powerful tale for teens (and adults) about anxiety, love and friendship.” —The Los Angeles Times“Turtles delivers a lesson that we so desperately need right now: Yes, it is okay not to be okay…. John Green has crafted a dynamic novel that is deeply honest, sometimes painful, and always thoughtful.” – Mashable“Green does more than write about; he endeavours to write inside…. No matter where you are on the spiral—and we’re all somewhere—Green’s novel makes the trip, either up or down, a less solitary experience.” – The Globe and Mail“A thoughtful look at mental illness and a debilitating obsessive-compulsive disorder that doesn’t ask but makes you feel the constant struggles of its main character. . . . Turtles explores the definition of happy endings, whether love is a tragedy or a failure, and a universal lesson for us all: ‘You work with what you have.’” – USA Today“A wrenching and revelatory novel.” – The New York Times “Tender, wise, and hopeful.” – The Wall Street Journal“A new modern classic.” – The Guardian“Green’s most authentic and most ambitious work to date.” – Bustle“An existential teenage scream.” – Vox“Funny, clever, and populated with endearing characters.” – Entertainment Weekly“An incredibly powerful tale of the pain of mental illness, the pressures of youth, and coming of age when you feel like you’re coming undone.” – Shelf Awareness★ “A richly rewarding read…the most mature of Green’s work to date and deserving of all the accolades that are sure to come its way.” – Booklist★ “In an age where troubling events happen almost weekly, this deeply empathetic novel about learning to live with demons and love one’s imperfect self is timely and important.” – Publishers Weekly★ “A deeply resonant and powerful novel that will inform and enlighten readers even as it breaks their hearts. A must-buy.” – School Library Journal  Praise for John Green- 50 million books in print worldwide - #1 New York Times Bestseller #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller #1 USA Today Bestseller #1 International Bestseller ★ Michael L. Printz Award Winner★ Michael L. Printz Honor Winner ★ Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist★ TIME 100 Most Influential People★ Forbes Celebrity 100 ★ NPR's 100 Best-Ever Teen Novels ★ TIME Magazine's 100 Best Young Adult Books of All TimeCritical acclaim for The Fault in Our Stars:   “Damn near genius . . . The Fault in Our Stars is a love story, one of the most genuine and moving ones in recent American fiction, but it’s also an existential tragedy of tremendous intelligence and courage and sadness.” —Lev Grossman, TIME Magazine   “This is a book that breaks your heart—not by wearing it down, but by making it bigger until it bursts.” —The Atlantic  “Remarkable . . . A pitch-perfect, elegiac comedy.” —USA Today “[Green’s] voice is so compulsively readable that it defies categorization. You will be thankful for the little infinity you spend inside this book.” —NPR.org“John Green deftly mixes the profound and the quotidian in this tough, touching valentine to the human spirit.” —The Washington Post    “[Green] shows us true love—two teenagers helping and accepting each other through the most humiliating physical and emotional ordeals—and it is far more romantic than any sunset on the beach.” —New York Times Book Review