Turtles All The Way Down by John GreenTurtles All The Way Down by John Green

Turtles All The Way Down

byJohn Green

Hardcover | October 10, 2017

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about

“Wrenching and revelatory,” #1 bestseller Turtles All the Way Down is a widely acclaimed best book of 2017!

A New York Times Notable Book • A New York Times Critics’ Top Book of the Year • An NPR Best Book of the Year • A TIME Best Book of the Year • A Wall Street Journal Best Book of the Year • A Boston Globe Best Book of the Year • An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year • A Seventeen Best Book of the Year • A Southern Living Best Book of the Year • A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year • A Booklist Editors' Choice Selection • A BookPage Best Book of the Year • An SLJ Best Book of the Year • An A.V. Club Best Book of the Year • A Bustle Best Book of the Year • A BuzzFeed Best Book of the Year • A Pop Sugar Best Book of the Year • A Vulture Best Book of the Year 

#1 New York Times Bestseller • #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller • #1 International Bestseller

Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis.
   
Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. 
 
In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.
John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan), and The Fault in Our Stars. His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize...
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Title:Turtles All The Way DownFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 8.56 × 5.81 × 1.12 inPublished:October 10, 2017Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0525555366

ISBN - 13:9780525555360

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from My favourite book! Though this book is slow paced and not very plot based, I loved it. As someone with an anxiety disorder, I really related to the main characters experiences.
Date published: 2018-01-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nothing Special, but a nice read Nothing too crazy or worth mentioning, but if you're looking for something that you can keep on your shelf and reread from time to time, this is it. Its nice.
Date published: 2018-01-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating look at OCD Loved this introspective novel, but it is unfortunate that it was marketed as being a hunt for a lost millionaire, rather than the coming of age story it is. I would highly recommend this book for fans of his writing - if you haven't enjoyed his writing before now, you still won't.
Date published: 2018-01-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from brilliant insights into someone else's mind As an adult reader, this book felt more like a Young Adult novel to me than TFIOS did, and for that reason I enjoyed it less. But more importantly, I’m always grateful to authors who tackle mental health issues, who attempt to explain the unexplainable. Severe anxiety is not a challenge I've faced in my own life but I hope reading books like this will help me be more understanding.
Date published: 2018-01-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read Although I did not enjoy it as much as The Fault in Our Stars, it was a good read!
Date published: 2018-01-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Did not disappoint I counted down the days until I received my copy being a hard core John Green fan! As always he blows me away with some of his simple yet insightful lines that I will probably later get tattooed on me. Engaging characters, cute story and as always, you pause and learn a little something about humanity.
Date published: 2018-01-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Your Typical John Green Book From reading many of his other books, I found this one to be somewhat more elementary. I was still immersed in it as much as the other ones because it is so easy to read, however, I found personally that I enjoyed his other works more. Still an AMAZING book, definitely read!
Date published: 2018-01-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok A friend recommended this to me, and it was wonderful!
Date published: 2018-01-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from SO GOOD! This book is amazing. At first the book goes into great detail and is better every chapter. A great read!
Date published: 2018-01-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Funny I've read most of his work and I have to say, this is my favourite. He is amazing at writing in a female point of view. And though I did not love all of his books, I must say I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Date published: 2018-01-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Alright book. I am a huge John Green fan, and this book was good. It captured mental illness perfectly in glimpses but also felt a little too try hard. Overall, worth the read, but many of his other books fall ahead of this one in my opinion.
Date published: 2018-01-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from great read interesting and captivating. finally a john green book that doesn't make you ball your eyes out
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Could be better This is a quick read with some interesting insights about OCD, but the plot is almost non-existent.
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing and beautiful book I bought this just after Christmas and once I started reading it I wasn't able to put it down (I managed to finish the whole book in just one night. John Green did an amazing job at avoiding the romanticization of mental health disorders. He depicted the relationship of Aza and Davis in a realistic way, taking into consideration the circumstances. Throughout the book, we see Aza's growth and development of strength as well and herself beginning to accept her disorder. The major plot of the disappearance of Davis' father was slightly unneccesary, but I think it also brought forth a valid reason for Aza and Davis to rekindle their connection with eachother. Overrall, the story was beautiful and realistic. John Green is certainly one of my go to authors.
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok everyone had been telling me to pick this book up, and I had super high expectations. However, when I actually read it, I realized it was NOT worth it
Date published: 2018-01-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok everyone had been telling me to pick this book up, and I had super high expectations. However, when I actually read it, I realized it was NOT worth it
Date published: 2018-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Relevant and Informative Turtles All the Way Down (TATWD) isn't a traditional love story, but a story about mental illness and dealing with ever-tightening thought spirals, while going through high school (and all it's drama). TATWD is an important novel to read as it opens one's eyes to the life of an individual struggling with a mental illness, in this case, OCD, without sugar coating (much at all), and without being over dramatic. John Green''s descriptions of Aza's thoughts and thought spirals were incredible.
Date published: 2018-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! "-and I kept thinking about how the sky is a singular noun, as if it's one thing. But the sky isn't one thing. The sky is everything." When I put this book down, I cried a thousand tears. #plumreview
Date published: 2018-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Another great book by John Green Always amazed at how well his books are written. I didn't care for the plot, but I loved his description of Aza's thoughts and her struggle with OCD/anxiety.
Date published: 2018-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fav Author he never fails to write a good book!
Date published: 2018-01-04
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not the greatest! I liked the way John Green has decided to write about mental illness in his book. It felt real and not romanticized as mental illness is usually portrayed in books and movies etc. I just didn't care the "missing" aspect of the story and wish it was more about her struggles with her illness.
Date published: 2018-01-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I could have done without the "romantic" subplot
Date published: 2018-01-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great story! Great representation of mental illness and the plot is enlightening. Would read it again.
Date published: 2017-12-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from John Green wins me over again Ordered this book a few months ago and read it in a day. Possibly one of Green's best books in my opinion :)
Date published: 2017-12-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enlightening. If you are a sufferer of anxiety, Aza will make sense to you. Each of Aza's episodes were described in such immense detail... and he got all the details right. The sweating, the stomach pain, the spiralling thoughts. Sometimes when people describe mental illness they make their characters the victim but I found that John did the opposite. Aza, even though she would disagree, was defiantly a fighter (like most of us end up being without even realizing it). He brought attention to how every day tasks can feel like climbing mountains and how even though she was afraid she was also courageous. Even though life scared her she still woke up everyday and lived it. Overall great read and very relatable to those who have Aza's illness OR TO THOSE WHO WOULD LIKE TO UNDERSTAND IT. The only downside would be the begging of the book was very long and tedious. It picks up at Chapter 11. Also the ending was very rushed and abstract. I would've enjoyed to know where she ended up going for college.
Date published: 2017-12-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Love! Great edition for Green's oeuvre
Date published: 2017-12-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book was very difficult to get into
Date published: 2017-12-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great John Green is one of my favourite authors, so this review may be a tad biased, but this book was wonderful. I loved the exploration he took with mental health - it was refreshing and progressive.
Date published: 2017-12-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Perspective I received this book for Christmas and quickly finished it. I found that it gave a better perspective on OCD than many other teen fiction books. I think the secondary plot about the missing business man was unnecessary and that it should have focused on the main character and her struggles dealing with OCD and managing friendships and relationships, but overall I think it was better than a lot of Green's books. Definitely would read again even if it was slightly over hyped.
Date published: 2017-12-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome John Green! John Green is back at it! I had no idea what to expect when going into this, but loved it! Never seen mental health struggles portrayed so accurately! #plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a well thought written! can't wait to read it again! and to share with friends. Great talk!
Date published: 2017-12-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Slow but Good This novel definitely has a few pacing issues but it's still beautifully written. I can't say it lived up to the hype, but it was still a great book.
Date published: 2017-12-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved it to the ending. The ending was a bit too much, but I have hope that the series will be redeemed
Date published: 2017-12-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved it to the ending. The ending was a bit too much, but I have hope that the series will be redeemed
Date published: 2017-12-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I need to re-read this, as I rushed through it the first time because I was busy, but nonetheless, I enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-12-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I need to re-read this, as I rushed through it the first time because I was busy, but nonetheless, I enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-12-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from YES! John Green is one of my favourite authors, so this review may be a tad biased, but this book was wonderful. I loved the exploration he took with mental health - it was refreshing and progressive. It can read a little slow, but it is written so well.
Date published: 2017-12-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good I need to re-read this, as I rushed through it the first time because I was busy, but nonetheless, I enjoyed it. dftba
Date published: 2017-12-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Get out of my head! **spoiler alert** I waited most of 2017 for this book to come out. I counted hours, minutes, and seconds (with help from a wonderful website that literally had turtles all the way down) and now finally not only do I have this wonderful book, but I’ve read every single marking, front to back. It’s hard to tell if my judgments are biased because John wrote it, or because I can relate so closely to its main character, but needless to say my thoughts are this: Turtles All The Way Down is a beautiful work of art. In John's previous work, I always fell in love with the writing, because I felt like I was having a conversation with the main characters. It was so light, and easy to read, and intelligent, that I just fell into the story. That's how I fell in love with his writing, and reading in general: "slowly, and then all at once." But with TATWD, which I've come to pronounce as Tat-wad, it’s different. This book wasn't like a conversation; it was like I WAS “Aza ‘And Then Eventually You Die’ Holmes.” When she could not hear the conversations around her, because her knowledge of the human microbiota was drowning out the real word, I also could not partake in the conversations around her. It is a rare few books that make me feel like I've fallen this deep into a character, and so involuntarily. I was so frustrated with these thought spirals. I wanted to hear more about Mychal’s art or my best friends fan fic, but as Aza, I was forced to fret over whether I was a person, and whether that personhood was at risk of death by microbial invasion. The limited point of view with Aza, makes it all feel so real, and personal. This book shows you that “True terror isn’t being scared, it’s not having a choice in the matter.” I know it's been said already, but mental illness, at least in my experience, is very much like this. It doesn't allow you to choose between your inner dialogue and the real world, and no amount of words the outside world offers could ever quell the fears. Instead we learn therapies, and tactics that help make living with mental illness a little better. It is not heroic. It is not a superpower. But it is also nothing to be pitied or feared; it just is. John Green’s book does a marvelous job of demonstrating just that, while also keeping you anxiously turning each page to see what's next for Aza. Will she find her way up out of the wormhole or get lost within it? So what are you waiting for? Pick up the book, and find out for yourself. Seriously – go get the book now and read it, you will not be disappointed. For anyone suffering from mental illness, I strongly urge you to seek help if you haven’t, and to take the help you have sought out seriously, if you have. Remember not every counselor or therapist will be a fit for you, and that’s okay. Do your best to take care of yourself, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and take these beautiful words of wisdom from Aza’s mother: “Your now is not your forever.”
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ok read It was an okay read - there was so much hype that I was expecting amazing. It was okay
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok While I saw parts of the plot coming I was incredibly surprised by the ending.
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great loved everything about this
Date published: 2017-12-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved everything about this book!
Date published: 2017-12-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I loved everything about this book!
Date published: 2017-12-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING! This book was absolutely amazing!!!! The character depth was amazing and it really puts you in her mind and I think everyone needs to read this book.
Date published: 2017-12-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not bad the characters were well developed and the plot is ok, I would recommend it to read
Date published: 2017-12-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Must read! I had really high expectations for this book and it did not disappointment. It's the perfect John Green story, a story that if told by anyone other than Green it would probably not have been this great. I absolutely loved it. It presents and evokes such raw emotions and thoughts. Highly recommend. "True terror isn't being scared; it's not having a choice in the matter"
Date published: 2017-12-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heartbreaking And Hopeful Turtles All The Way Down is phenomenal! It's a story about living with mental illness (which is never romanticized or trivialized) and how it affects relationships. Written with Green's signature combination of wit and pathos, it's a triumphant return to writing.
Date published: 2017-12-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from amazing but not surprised i was lucky enough to get the last signed copy in store :) but before that, it was such a good read definatley will be picking it up in the future
Date published: 2017-12-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok good book- takes a while to get into but left me wanting to read the sequel!!!
Date published: 2017-12-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Such a good read Loved this story and the characters #Plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok good book- takes a while to get into but left me wanting to read the sequel!!!
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing Author Amazing author with great character development.
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome I've read many of John Greens books and I think this one is my favourite so far! #plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from so good I really loved the main character
Date published: 2017-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great! (As every book from John Green, frankly) While it is not as good as TFIOS (though I truly believe none could surpass this one), this book was enjoyable. Main character is endearing and the story is touching, which is why I do recommand it.
Date published: 2017-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good This was a good, quick read. Compelling characters. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-12-05
Rated 2 out of 5 by from ok not as good as better than alaska
Date published: 2017-12-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book consumed me. I lived in every word, and felt every feeling.
Date published: 2017-12-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book consumed me. I lived in every word, and felt every feeling.
Date published: 2017-12-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This book consumed me. I lived in every word, and felt every feeling.
Date published: 2017-12-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book! I really enjoyed reading this! Some parts slowed down and got a little bit boring compared to John Greens' other books. Nonetheless, I would definitely recommend this to others!
Date published: 2017-12-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Talks about issues present in our society.
Date published: 2017-11-28
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not great Time to face it: The Fault In Our Stars is the only great book John Green is going to write. I was disappointed by his latest book because it lacked momentum and was not a satisfying read. Maybe think about borrowing this one from a friend, but do not buy.
Date published: 2017-11-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A Disappointment with a Capital D. It was horrible, not at all John Green's style. He should stay away from detectives and continue pursuing his philosophical and eloquent works.
Date published: 2017-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyed After not being able to get into Looking For Alaska, I was a little skeptical going in but I think this book accurately describes the thought spirals and was an enjoyable read.
Date published: 2017-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read A lighter read, but still great nonetheless. If you're a fan of John Green's work, this book is a must!
Date published: 2017-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Surprisingly amazing! I swore to myself NEVER to purchase a John Green book ever again because of the mediocrity of his writing and his boring and lifeless characters. But nonetheless, picked this up anyways as an impulse buy and because I love feeding into consumerism. Surprisingly, I found it to be pretty good! The novel focuses less on a romantic aspect, but more on the main character herself and her struggles. Found it to be a great and refreshing read!
Date published: 2017-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from great easy read im 20 and this YA book just swept me away nice and easy to get lost in always looking for books like this. recomend as a good read to curl up in bed with warning it did make me cry
Date published: 2017-11-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Gut-Wrenching Look at Mental Illness I went into this novel prepared that it would not be as good as "The Fault in Our Stars", ready to be disappointed. I was not. This book is an honest look inside the head of someone with OCD. It acts more as a case study than as a story. At times it is so honest that it is hard to read. I was at times in tears.
Date published: 2017-11-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Can't wait for the next one.
Date published: 2017-11-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this. Have been a fan of John Green for quite some time, but I think this is my new favourite book of his. Read it in a few hours. Would recommend this read for people who have enjoyed his books previously.
Date published: 2017-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I am so glad that I have read this novel. John Green definitely does not disappoint. The way the author writes is exquisite. This novel is definitely a must read! In this novel, he brings to life the real struggles of mental illness and how it affects people. Not just the person with the illness, but literally everyone around them. He does not romanticize it or sugar coat it so the readers can try to understand. He simply tells it how it is which is so great because it gives the readers a real look at what some of those struggles are, whether or not they fully understand it. He does not explain it for them to understand, and I think this just how it works in real life. If you want to truly understand the ins and outs then you would have to do your own separate research (which in my personal opinion I believe everyone should do whether they read the book or not). Mental illnesses are so intricate and so complicating just as many other illnesses are whether mental or physical or psychological. And just as with any illness, you can never truly know why you catch it or develop it or in what ways it will affect you until you are the person that gets it yourself. This book is a perfect example of how it is like when people or for people who struggle with mental illnesses. What I truly like about this book as well is that it does not only focus on mental illness. It has so many topics in it as well such as the following: Family - It shows how family members can try understanding and helping the people the love who are struggling. Friendship - It shows that you can find friends who will love you for you whether or not you are still in the process of figuring out how to love yourself. Love - There is a love connection in this story which is hot predictable at all which is why I love this story that much more (I will not say more about this because I do not want to spoil). Loss - There are people in this story who are going through the struggle of loosing people close to them. In the main characters case, she is going through a process of trying to find herself since she feels kind of lost herself. Drama - There is drama is this novel as well, such as arguments and trying to find missing people..whether that be someone else and/or yourself. Mystery - The mystery in this story is that there is an actual person who is physically missing (not metaphorically like I stated in the point above) and you find yourself trying to solve where he could be and why before the book reveals it. You literally get a piece of everything when reading this story and it touches almost every aspect of your emotions whether that be happiness for when something good happens, or sadness for when the story doesn't quite go exactly in the same direction as how you wanted. Either way, it will have you feeling so many feels and it will make you want the book to not have an ending to it, so you can keep on reading.
Date published: 2017-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The way the author writes is exquisite. This novel is definitely a must read! In this novel, he brings to life the real struggles of mental illness and how it affects people. Not just the person with the illness, but literally everyone around them. He does not romanticize it or sugar coat it so the readers can try to understand. He simply tells it how it is which is so great because it gives the readers a real look at what some of those struggles are, whether or not they fully understand it. He does not explain it for them to understand, and I think this just how it works in real life. If you want to truly understand the ins and outs then you would have to do your own separate research (which in my personal opinion I believe everyone should do whether they read the book or not). Mental illnesses are so intricate and so complicating just as many other illnesses are whether mental or physical or psychological. And just as with any illness, you can never truly know why you catch it or develop it or in what ways it will affect you until you are the person that gets it yourself. This book is a perfect example of how it is like when people or for people who struggle with mental illnesses. What I truly like about this book as well is that it does not only focus on mental illness. It has so many topics in it as well such as the following: Family - It shows how family members can try understanding and helping the people the love who are struggling. Friendship - It shows that you can find friends who will love you for you whether or not you are still in the process of figuring out how to love yourself. Love - There is a love connection in this story which is hot predictable at all which is why I love this story that much more (I will not say more about this because I do not want to spoil). Loss - There are people in this story who are going through the struggle of loosing people close to them. In the main characters case, she is going through a process of trying to find herself since she feels kind of lost herself. Drama - There is drama is this novel as well, such as arguments and trying to find missing people..whether that be someone else and/or yourself. Mystery - The mystery in this story is that there is an actual person who is physically missing (not metaphorically like I stated in the point above) and you find yourself trying to solve where he could be and why before the book reveals it. You literally get a piece of everything when reading this story and it touches almost every aspect of your emotions whether that be happiness for when something good happens, or sadness for when the story doesn't quite go exactly in the same direction as how you wanted. Either way, it will have you feeling so many feels and it will make you want the book to not have an ending to it, so you can keep on reading.
Date published: 2017-11-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Three stars Fairly good read. Glad I picked it up.
Date published: 2017-11-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Interesting read Really steady book, if you like John Green you will enjoy this as well.
Date published: 2017-11-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Deeper than it seems John Green hits jackpot again! Although it aims at the YA audience and the premise of the story is quite simple, the depth of the characters adds a complexity that makes them relatable regardless of your age.
Date published: 2017-11-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read! I think Turtles All The Way Down is one of my favourite books of 2017. From the start of listening to the audiobook and reading along with it, I was hooked with the story. You can relate to Aza in many ways. The struggles with anxiety and OCD are both mental issues that we don't see lots of in YA and it was portrayed really well by John Green who also faces OCD. When you finish the book you can see why the story is called Turtles All The Way Down because Aza's thoughts are spiralling when her other thoughts come to do something else. I loved how John Green created Daisy! She was hilarious, smart and knows what she wants. Her relationship with Aza had so much energy and brought out Aza's personality (even when she is trapped in her own head) and you read about the ups and down of their friendship as her condition does make Aza self-absorbed). Daisy calls it as it is which is another thing I loved about her character. Lets now get to our other main character, Davis. I loved their awkwardness (with her germaphopia and hypochondria with his own defences) I found that while it was hard to see them try to connect. I felt heartbroken by the end! Which I guess is normal in any of John Green's books. Overall, mental health was portrayed well and it gives awareness for others and connection between all the characters.
Date published: 2017-11-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A good read Bought this this month. Was expecting it to be better.
Date published: 2017-11-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enjoyed! I'm usually skeptical to popular books since they don't make you think but this was a refreshing book and one I've constantly reached for lately!
Date published: 2017-11-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Such A Good Book From the previous John Green books I expected a full on romance but its main focus was more about the main character and how she deals with her mental health more than anything.It was a great book and there should be more like this out in the world.
Date published: 2017-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Lived up to my expectations If you like his other books, you will not be disappointed!
Date published: 2017-11-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from read this This is a fantastic book, but i thought it would have more story, it is very simple, but at the end you will be glad that you read it. But it has amazing writing and you almost feel it.
Date published: 2017-11-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love it! Always love John's writing, this was a nice change from TFIOS
Date published: 2017-11-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyed Really quick read and good depiction of mental illness. I can almost feel Aza's mind reeling.
Date published: 2017-11-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from excellent my sister screamed when I gave this to her, and absolutely loved it!
Date published: 2017-11-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Really enjoyed the characters.
Date published: 2017-11-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Portrait of OCD I actually hadn't planned on reading this, because I've only liked one of John Green's previous books and strongly disliked all the others. But I got a copy of this for my birthday, and I figured it was only right to give it a read. And I was actually pleasantly surprised. It's not quite the level of Looking For Alaska, but it was a good story, with some really wonderful moments. Though I am on the team where I would have liked more turtles, I am rather okay with the lack of them, given that the story turned out so well. The Good Points of Turtles All The Way Down: The representation and portrayal of OCD in this book is amazing. It actually makes you uncomfortable to be reading about it, because it's so brutally honest. The good and the bad points were left in there, and it worked so well for this book. Though I alternatively hated and loved Aza and Daisy's friendship, I enjoyed the honesty that came along with that too. There is a lot going on in your teen years, and there's a lot of stuff that needs to be worked though. Add some mental illness to that, and you've got a whole other mess that it obviously going to make it hard for two people to always have this perfect, beautiful friendship. I love what Green does with the love interest. I won't say much, for fear of ruining it, but it's a nice variation, and I was super pleased by it. One thing I really enjoyed about this book was that every character had their 'thing'. Aza had germs, Daisy had fanfiction, Davis had astronomy, and so on. I like when they do that, because we all have a thing don't we? Green does an amazing job of creating realistic, honest teenagers, which I guess is what I'm getting at with all the above points. He just seems to know how to make them so that they feel real, as opposed to so many characters in other books. The Downsides of Turtles All The Way Down: There was so much going on in this book that I felt like it took away from it at times. There was the love interests/relationships, the missing billionaire, Aza's OCD, Aza and Daisy's friendship, the tuatara, the whole money thing, and a whole bunch of other details that got shoved into a less than 300 page book. That's a lot, and I felt like it could have been way more powerful if we didn't have so many diversions throughout the story. I found the first half of this book rather dull and boring. The second half was awesome, but it took a long time to get into this. This is something I've noticed before in Green's characters, and it's that I wish there was more variety in their intelligence. Every character in this story is stupid smart. And it's not that teenagers can't be smart, because they can. But the likelihood of all of them being of equal, crazy intelligence is pretty slim. And it's part of why things get boring. All in all, I did really enjoy this book, and it's given me hope that John Green writes something other than messed up love stories. It's a great mental health book, and Aza has some really great moments throughout the story. If you enjoy honest portrayals, stupid smart kids, and busy books, you'll likely enjoy Turtles All The Way Down.
Date published: 2017-11-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great book! Great book, enjoyed it a lot
Date published: 2017-11-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from True to Green I enjoyed this novel, as I have enjoyed all of Green's novels. I would not put it at par with Looking for Alaska, nor The Fault in Our Stars, but assessing the book as it stands alone, it was a good read. I am glad that novels circulating mental health issues are making their way into the mainstream. I resonated with the main character, and found the analogies made by Green to all be accurate. I believe that, in writing this novel, Green will help to end the stigma which still exists around mental health, mainly by touching a new generation of teens and preteens. The book was well written, though fell a bit short of my expectation (again, who wouldn't expect all of Green's works to wow equally?) The ending still wrenched my heart, as all of Green's novels are apt to do. 4/5, would suggest.
Date published: 2017-11-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok really good when you are a fan!
Date published: 2017-11-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting but Good I find that the beginning of John Green's books are very slow which makes it hard to get into it. After reading a few of his other novels, I just had to see what this one is about. The story is a little strange however, I loved the development of the characters though! A MUST read if you have read some of John Green's books.
Date published: 2017-11-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from FLAWLESS This book was STUNNING. Which, I mean ... John Green. Were we expecting anything less than breathtaking? I was able to pick this book up, not knowing ANYTHING about it. Not the synopsis or the plot or even the characters' names and I was so totally engrossed by the entire story that I couldn't put it down. Lovely and ugly and honest, even when you wish it'd lie. Definitely a 5 star book
Date published: 2017-11-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from another good john green book isn't disappointing but wasn't really outstanding either. i think it was overhyped for me, otherwise i might have enjoyed it more. really good book still
Date published: 2017-11-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth the wait! Well worth the wait and anticipation. John Green always writes super well and this book was no different. I read his previous books when I was younger, and this was a great read many years later. The way he wrote about Aza's anxious/ocd thoughts and tendencies really had the ability to reel you in and allow you to understand them. I do wish the ending was better, especially how things ended with Aza and Davis, however it was still a great and easy read
Date published: 2017-11-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely Love It! I couldn't stop reading. It's a sweet story yet it has serious topics. In no particular order what I loved about this: 1. Mental Health Awareness 2. Tuatara 3. Daisy the best friend 4. Star Wars 5. Life of the Rich 6. Stars 7. Poetry and Art 8. The Friendships and Relationships 9. I think I'm well informed about microbes 10. Car Names
Date published: 2017-11-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from typical typical john green, entertaining but predictable
Date published: 2017-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great to have a new John Green novel in my hands! John delivers a wonderful new story full of life. These characters are fresh and real and living down the street at this very moment. Aza's daily struggle with herself is palpable and heartwrenchingly beautiful.
Date published: 2017-11-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazzzzing This was a very enjoyable read.
Date published: 2017-11-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from LOVED IT! one of Green's best books so far!
Date published: 2017-11-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from So good! Definitely my favourite John Green book so far. The characters were so well written and reading this just felt super nostalgic for me. Highly recommend this even if you weren't the biggest fan of his other books like I was!
Date published: 2017-11-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Another classic John Green <3 I really enjoyed this book as I do with all of John's novels. The stories are always easy to read, relatable in intriguing. I was captivated by the focus on Aza's illness while also rooting for the romance between her and Davis. Overall a a good, easy read.
Date published: 2017-11-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Mediocre Green is defiantly a young person's author. I don't know if this kind of story is for adults, because it can be dull at times, however I did like the plot and character development.
Date published: 2017-11-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from It's Intense (AND THE HYPE IS REAL) “The way he talked about thoughts was the way I experienced them – not as a choice but a destiny. Not a catalogue of my consciousness, but a refutation of it.” When you flip open a new book by an author you’ve read multiple books from before, it’s only natural to compare the books and figure out where this new one stands on your list. Which I think was a mistake because Turtles All The Way Down is unlike anything I’ve ever read before and when you do read it, you’ll fully understand what I’m talking about. Turtles All The Way Down was ABSOLUTELY EXCEPTIONAL and INTENSE and reading it was a journey that everyone should take. Turtles All The Way Down was a harrowing depiction of life from a teenager who suffers from mental illness and it was astoundingly well done MY THOUGHTS: 1. I have missed John Green’s writing. Nobody else writes like him, with shrewd observations, quirk, sass and dialogue that will make you think. It’s been forever since I experienced his writing, but waiting all these years for Turtles All The Way Down was worth it. I’ve never seen mental illness represented better. 2. AZA WAS A BRILLIANT CHARACTER. I LOVE her name and the story behind it but I loved the girl the name belonged to too. I realised mid-way through the book that even though the whole thing was told from her own point of view, she barely spoke at all. This book is told mostly through her thoughts and her illness. She was extremely intelligent and flawed and me describing her doesn’t do justice to her character at all. 3. The OCD/ Anxiety rep is INTENSE. And it felt so real and palpable to me. There was this one particular scene where Aza’s ‘rational’ brain and her illness are battling it out against each other and I had to put the book down after because John Green and Aza make you FEEL and I needed a breather. 4. I think one of my big problems and the reason that this book wasn’t a five star for me is the pretentiousness of the characters, specifically the best friend Daisy. I’m ALL for pretentious characters but why does EACH AND EVERY CHARACTER HAVE TO BE PRETENTIONS/ MANIC PIXIE DREAM-Y? Daisy was… obnoxious. AND RUDE AND HORRIBLE and she *SPOILER* [ wrote fanfic about her best friend who had a debilitating mental illness by calling her ‘useless’ and an idiot and it HURT ME PHYSICALLY THAT SHE COULD DO SOMETHING LIKE THAT. HOW.] I wanted to strangle her because she was NOT A GOOD FRIEND AT ALL. STOP. 5. I’m not 100% sure how I felt about the romance between Davis and Aza. I LOVED them as individual characters and I loved their interactions but it was a little too flawless for two teenagers. I loved them and I also… didn’t? I’m a confusing person, I know. All in all, this book is real and brilliant and intense and it talks about who we are, who are thoughts belong to and it will make you FEEL. This book makes you understand mental illness in such an intimate and personal manner and I have, once again, been left in awe of John Green’s masterful writing. 4 stars.
Date published: 2017-11-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Thought it was pretty good but not spectacular
Date published: 2017-11-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Thought it was pretty good but not spectacular
Date published: 2017-11-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Thought it was pretty good but not spectacular
Date published: 2017-11-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Riveting. This book is riveting.
Date published: 2017-11-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I found the writing a bit boastful and dull at the same time.
Date published: 2017-11-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I found the writing a bit boastful and dull at the same time.
Date published: 2017-11-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from This was ok I liked this book but didn't love it. I know Aza's mental illness is supposed to be the main focus of the story, but I wish Green put a bit more attention on the mystery aspect.
Date published: 2017-11-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from its a 50/50 for me its an okay book the start is'nt all that great. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-11-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from pretty good I'm going to talk about the ending because thats what I liked most of all. In the end, the main character was going to be just fine.
Date published: 2017-10-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this book! Typically I don't read books aside from business and personal development. This book was chosen by our book club and I couldn't put it down.
Date published: 2017-10-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from He does it again In classic John Green style this book pulls at the heart strings and dives below the surface level to deeper issues and topics that will resonate with youth and adults alike,
Date published: 2017-10-30
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Such an inspiring and interesting read, simply could not put it down! Great job!
Date published: 2017-10-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from turtles all the way down amazing book, shows the true life of living with OCD
Date published: 2017-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from so so so love I loved this book! just couldnt get away from it!
Date published: 2017-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from FANtastic Awesome novel, just was so beautifully written
Date published: 2017-10-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok I thought I would be lost with no idea about what was going on within the story or the characters. Man, I'm happy I was wrong on that account.
Date published: 2017-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this book I bought this a week ago and it was worth every single penny. Definitely one of the best books I have read in a while.
Date published: 2017-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! Amazing book! I cant believe I have to wait for another now! Time to re-read!
Date published: 2017-10-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Very well written but cvould have been ore descriptive of each of the instances that were felt.
Date published: 2017-10-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from love john greene nails it on the perspective of aza's character feeling like she's trapped by a mental illness. it is a very good read, i could get lost in it for a little while. i'm really impressed with his consistency in novels. i reccomend!!
Date published: 2017-10-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from no It's not especially well-written and basically serves as millennial bait.
Date published: 2017-10-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from no It's not especially well-written and basically serves as millennial bait.
Date published: 2017-10-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from no It's not especially well-written and basically serves as millennial bait.
Date published: 2017-10-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A spot-on depiction of what it's like to have OCD This is John Green's best novel, and easily his most personal one -- Green himself suffers from OCD, the condition that plagues main character Aza, and which takes up most of the book's narrative focus. I've had OCD since I was very young, and hearing about TATWD's non-comedic, serious portrayal of OCD was what prompted me to buy this book. I wasn't disappointed! Turtles All The Way Down shows the "thought spirals" of OCD and intrusive thoughts in excruciatingly accurate detail. At points it was almost too realistic to read comfortably. For readers with mental illness, it will be a cathartic experience, of "Oh my god, he gets it!" For readers without mental illnesses, it is a great resource for understanding the way your loved ones with anxiety and OCD feel and think every day. I've read several of Green's other books and always found them interesting, but a little "young" (which makes sense, given that they're YA genre). Turtles All The Way Down has some of those same youthful quirks (like a character who is obsessed with Star Wars fanfiction), but they feel more authentic this time, and they serve a purpose in the story. Some people call Green's writing a bit pretentious (I wouldn't necessarily agree) but TATWD manages to avoid this altogether by making Aza's dialogue more curt and realistic and centring the internal monologues around Aza's OCD thought spirals and her realistic teen worries, rather than beyond-her-years musings about life and love (a la Looking for Alaska, TFIOS). It's definitely worth $16, I'll tell you that.
Date published: 2017-10-25
Rated 2 out of 5 by from started off okay It was okay at first, then got kind of boring
Date published: 2017-10-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from amazing, in-depth book john green hasn't disappointed readers with his books that address societal issues at a deeper level. his books are not light reads (although that doesn't stop readers from reading it like it is) but if you delve deeper, the novel is open to you on a whole new level. amazing.
Date published: 2017-10-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Infused with hope Anyone struggling with mental illness needs to read this. I feel this book relates specifically to teens and mental health, which it should, I mean, it's YA. But that's exactly why it's extraordinary. It will benefit its purposed audience in extraordinary ways. I'm so proud of John for writing this book, and extremely grateful to him. This book DOES NOT have as much "John Green" as everyone is saying it has. TFIOS and previous books were far more pretentious. Yes, his voice is still there, but not as drastically as before, and I think it's an honest, perfect blend. The book has character without being an overkill, and it truly is a worthwhile, necessary story.
Date published: 2017-10-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Great book, the introduction of some characters and the setting was fantastic and I enjoy the way it's been written out in the book
Date published: 2017-10-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Great book, the introduction of some characters and the setting was fantastic and I enjoy the way it's been written out in the book
Date published: 2017-10-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from LOVED THIS! John Green never fails to disappoint me! I This is the only book that I have read on anxiety and I loved how the focus was not on romance but on Aza's character and personality! Beautifully written overall.
Date published: 2017-10-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from John Green's Most Anticipated Book Just bought the signed edition and I can't wait to read it!!
Date published: 2017-10-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from loeved it I expected nothing less from John Green
Date published: 2017-10-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really interesting story line Read this on my kobo, really liked it. Follow me on Goodreads to see more of what I read: Evareneg.
Date published: 2017-10-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent! I'm so happy with this book. If I sat down to read this at an earlier hour, this could have been another TFiOS where I easily read it in one sitting. (besides the first two chapters I read this in 2 sittings) because the writing and the dialogue and the characters make it so easy to melt into everything and forget that you're even reading. I thought everything about this book was so well done, from the conversations to the texting to the blog-stalking, to the inner OCD thoughts, to the very last line. this book, you guys, was definitely worth the wait.
Date published: 2017-10-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This was an interesting read full of life lessons learned through experiencing a terrible loss. Reading this provides insight into the grieving mind along with strategies to support someone experiencing los
Date published: 2017-10-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This was an interesting read full of life lessons learned through experiencing a terrible loss. Reading this provides insight into the grieving mind along with strategies to support someone experiencing los
Date published: 2017-10-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok This was an interesting read full of life lessons learned through experiencing a terrible loss. Reading this provides insight into the grieving mind along with strategies to support someone experiencing los
Date published: 2017-10-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from meh not a bad read during your comute to work
Date published: 2017-10-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from CW: anxiety & ocd This book is tremendously beautiful. John Green has done it again, written these amazingly real characters. As is real, she is sitting across from you on the train, he's someone you've known since elementary school. John Green is writing from his experience of dealing with mental issues, and that makes this book so, so real. I would be hesitant to recommend this to everyone, as I do think that reading this could trigger someones OCD.
Date published: 2017-10-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from content warning: Anxiety & OCD Amazing book, beautifully written as expected. John Green did it again, made me cry for like the entire book. Aza is real, she's sitting across from you on the train, he's a boy you knew from public school. John Green took the mental illness that he suffers from and wrote a book that is so painfully real. I would be hesitant to recommend this book to everyone, as I do find that it could be triggering to someones OCD. Tread lightly my friends, John Green is out to make us all sob uncontrollably. (Also I pre-ordered the book in August, and Indigo accidentally sent me a signed copy which is the happiest accident ever, I love this place!)
Date published: 2017-10-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Another Fab Read by John Green So glad I got this new release - and a signed copy at that! (green sharpie) I was hooked from page one and read it in two days. He writes about OCD delicately and respectfully, and his MC had me from page one - and not just because of her OCD. I couldn't put it down, and the hint of mystery kept me going. A recommended read that will go on my keeper shelf.
Date published: 2017-10-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from In love I haven't finished it yet but so far I love it
Date published: 2017-10-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read Was a great read, could not put the book down till it was finished.
Date published: 2017-10-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Real Great Novel I bought this on Monday morning and finished it Tuesday evening, if that doesn't give you a idea how good this novel is then I don't know what will. I was recommended this novel by a friend of mine who is a fan of John Green's novel, to be honest I've never read a single John Green book but I have watch The Fault In Our Stars movie and I thought it was beautifully done. That's beside the point, Turtles All The Way Down is complex in writing but also so beautifully written, its easy for me to say because I have already read it but you have to read it to understand where I am coming from, there is more depth then the two words I described the novel. So that being said I totally recommend this book to the obvious John Green fans but also to the ones who haven't read a single one of this book, I took a chance and it didn't leave me disappoint. I would like to also add I would love to see movie of this novel.
Date published: 2017-10-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love him but... Never red the book. Actually surprised to see him back.
Date published: 2017-10-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazinggg one word. Amazing. Green never dissapoints, and i thought that this book wouldnt even be as good as the fault in our stars, but i think its better. John Green has simply outdid himself!
Date published: 2017-10-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok read the partial arc for this and cant wait to get my hands on the rest soo excited its such an incredible thriller coming from a contemporary writer
Date published: 2017-10-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worth the wait He didn't disappoint! Especially considering he had to follow up The Fault In Our Stars.
Date published: 2017-10-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Overall, this book could have used some work but the general atmosphere was very gripping, and the character development was great!
Date published: 2017-10-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok Highly recommend even if you don't normally read fantasy
Date published: 2017-10-15

Read from the Book

ONEAt the time I first realized I might be fictional, my weekdays were spent at a publicly funded institution on the north side of Indianapolis called White River High School, where I was required to eat lunch at a particular time—between 12:37 p.m. and 1:14 p.m.—by forces so much larger than myself that I couldn’t even begin to identify them. If those forces had given me a different lunch period, or if the tablemates who helped author my fate had chosen a different topic of conversation that September day, I would’ve met a different end—or at least a different middle. But I was -beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell.Of course, you pretend to be the author. You have to. You think, I now choose to go to lunch, when that monotone beep rings from on high at 12:37. But really, the bell decides. You think you’re the painter, but you’re the canvas.Hundreds of voices were shouting over one another in the cafeteria, so that the conversation became mere sound, the rushing of a river over rocks. And as I sat beneath fluorescent cylinders spewing aggressively artificial light, I thought about how we all believed ourselves to be the hero of some personal epic, when in fact we were basically identical organisms colonizing a vast and windowless room that smelled of Lysol and lard.I was eating a peanut butter and honey sandwich and drinking a Dr Pepper. To be honest, I find the whole process of masticating plants and animals and then shoving them down my esophagus kind of disgusting, so I was trying not to think about the fact that I was eating, which is a form of thinking about it.Across the table from me, Mychal Turner was scribbling in a yellow-paper notebook. Our lunch table was like a long-running play on Broadway: The cast changed over the years, but the roles never did. Mychal was The Artsy One. He was talking with Daisy Ramirez, who’d played the role of my Best and Most Fearless Friend since elementary school, but I couldn’t follow their conversation over the noise of all the others.What was my part in this play? The Sidekick. I was Daisy’s Friend, or Ms. Holmes’s Daughter. I was somebody’s something.I felt my stomach begin to work on the sandwich, and even over everybody’s talking, I could hear it digesting, all the bacteria chewing the slime of peanut butter—the students inside of me eating at my internal cafeteria. A shiver convulsed through me.“Didn’t you go to camp with him?” Daisy asked me.“With who?”“Davis Pickett,” she said.“Yeah,” I said. “Why?”“Aren’t you listening?” Daisy asked. I am listening, I thought, to the cacophony of my digestive tract. Of course I’d long known that I was playing host to a massive collection of parasitic organisms, but I didn’t much like being reminded of it. By cell count, humans are approximately 50 percent microbial, meaning that about half of the cells that make you up are not yours at all. There are something like a thousand times more microbes living in my particular biome than there are human beings on earth, and it often seems like I can feel them living and breeding and dying in and on me. I wiped my sweaty palms on my jeans and tried to control my breathing. Admittedly, I have some anxiety problems, but I would argue it isn’t irrational to be concerned about the fact that you are a skin-encased bacterial colony.Mychal said, “His dad was about to be arrested for bribery or something, but the night before the raid he disappeared. There’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward out for him.”“And you know his kid,” Daisy said.“Knew him,” I answered.I watched Daisy attack her school-provided rectangular pizza and green beans with a fork. She kept glancing up at me, her eyes widening as if to say, Well ? I could tell she wanted me to ask her about something, but I couldn’t tell what, because my stomach wouldn’t shut up, which was forcing me deep inside a worry that I’d somehow contracted a parasitic infection.I could half hear Mychal telling Daisy about his new art project, in which he was using Photoshop to average the faces of a hundred people named Mychal, and the average of their faces would be this new, one-hundred-and-first Mychal, which was an interesting idea, and I wanted to listen, but the cafeteria was so loud, and I couldn’t stop wondering whether there was something wrong with the microbial balance of power inside me.Excessive abdominal noise is an uncommon, but not unprecedented, presenting symptom of infection with the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which can be fatal. I pulled out my phone and searched “human microbiome” to reread Wikipedia’s introduction to the trillions of microorganisms currently inside me. I clicked over to the article about C. diff, scrolling to the part about how most C. diff infections occur in hospitals. I scrolled down farther to a list of symptoms, none of which I had, except for the excessive abdominal noises, although I knew from previous searches that the Cleveland Clinic had reported the case of one person who’d died of C. diff after presenting at the hospital with only abdominal pain and fever. I reminded myself that I didn’t have a fever, and my self replied: You don’t have a fever YET.At the cafeteria, where a shrinking slice of my consciousness still resided, Daisy was telling Mychal that his averaging project shouldn’t be about people named Mychal but about imprisoned men who’d later been exonerated. “It’ll be easier, anyway,” she said, “because they all have mug shots taken from the same angle, and then it’s not just about names but about race and class and mass incarceration,” and Mychal was like, “You’re a genius, Daisy,” and she said, “You sound surprised,” and meanwhile I was thinking that if half the cells inside of you are not you, doesn’t that challenge the whole notion of me as a singular pronoun, let alone as the author of my fate? And I fell pretty far down that recursive wormhole until it transported me completely out of the White River High School cafeteria into some non-sensorial place only properly crazy people get to visit.Ever since I was little, I’ve pressed my right thumbnail into the finger pad of my middle finger, and so now there’s this weird callus over my fingerprint. After so many years of doing this, I can open up a crack in the skin really easily, so I cover it up with a Band-Aid to try to prevent infection. But sometimes I get worried that there already is an infection, and so I need to drain it, and the only way to do that is to reopen the wound and press out any blood that will come. Once I start thinking about splitting the skin apart, I literally cannot not do it. I apologize for the double negative, but it’s a real double negative of a situation, a bind from which negating the negation is truly the only escape. So anyway, I started to want to feel my thumbnail biting into the skin of my finger pad, and I knew that resistance was more or less futile, so beneath the cafeteria table, I slipped the Band-Aid off my finger and dug my thumbnail into the callused skin until I felt the crack open.“Holmesy,” Daisy said. I looked up at her. “We’re almost through lunch and you haven’t even mentioned my hair.” She shook out her hair, with so-red-they-were-pink highlights. Right. She’d dyed her hair.I swum up out of the depths and said, “It’s bold.”“I know, right? It says, ‘Ladies and gentlemen and also people who do not identify as ladies or gentlemen, Daisy Ramirez won’t break her promises, but she will break your heart.” Daisy’s self-proclaimed life motto was “Break Hearts, Not Promises.” She kept threatening to get it tattooed on her ankle when she turned eighteen. Daisy turned back to Mychal, and I to my thoughts. The stomach grumbling had grown, if anything, louder. I felt like I might vomit. For someone who actively dislikes bodily fluids, I throw up quite a lot.“Holmesy, you okay?” Daisy asked. I nodded. Sometimes I wondered why she liked me, or at least tolerated me. Why any of them did. Even I found myself annoying.I could feel sweat sprouting from my forehead, and once I begin to sweat, it’s impossible to stop. I’ll keep sweating for hours, and not just my face or my armpits. My neck sweats. My boobs sweat. My calves sweat. Maybe I did have a fever.Beneath the table, I slid the old Band-Aid into my pocket and, without looking, pulled out a new one, unwrapped it, and then glanced down to apply it to my finger. All the while, I was breathing in through my nose and out through my mouth, in the manner advised by Dr. Karen Singh, exhaling at a pace “that would make a candle flicker but not go out. Imagine that candle, Aza, flickering from your breath but still there, always there.” So I tried that, but the thought spiral kept tightening anyway. I could hear Dr. Singh saying I shouldn’t get out my phone, that I mustn’t look up the same questions over and over, but I got it out anyway, and reread the “Human Microbiota” Wikipedia article.The thing about a spiral is, if you follow it inward, it never actually ends. It just keeps tightening, infinitely.I sealed the Ziploc bag around the last quarter of my sandwich, got up, and tossed it into an overfilled trash can. I heard a voice from behind me. “How concerned should I be that you haven’t said more than two words in a row all day?”“Thought spiral,” I mumbled in reply. Daisy had known me since we were six, long enough to get it.“I figured. Sorry, man. Let’s hang out today.”This girl Molly walked up to us, smiling, and said, “Uh, Daisy, just FYI, your Kool-Aid dye job is staining your shirt.” Daisy looked down at her shoulders, and indeed, her striped top had turned pink in spots. She flinched for a second, then straightened her spine. “Yeah, it’s part of the look, Molly. Stained shirts are huge in Paris right now.” She turned away from Molly and said, “Right, so we’ll go to your house and watch Star Wars: Rebels.” Daisy was really into Star Wars—and not just the movies, but also the books and the animated shows and the kids’ show where they’re all made out of Lego. Like, she wrote fan fiction about Chewbacca’s love life. “And we will improve your mood until you are able to say three or even four words in a row; sound good?”“Sounds good.”“And then you can take me to work. Sorry, but I need a ride.”“Okay.” I wanted to say more, but the thoughts kept coming, unbidden and unwanted. If I’d been the author, I would’ve stopped thinking about my microbiome. I would’ve told Daisy how much I liked her idea for Mychal’s art project, and I would’ve told her that I did remember Davis Pickett, that I remembered being eleven and carrying a vague but constant fear. I would’ve told her that I remembered once at camp lying next to Davis on the edge of a dock, our legs dangling over, our backs against the rough-hewn planks of wood, staring together up at a cloudless summer sky. I would’ve told her that Davis and I never talked much, or even looked at each other, but it didn’t matter, because we were looking at the same sky together, which is maybe more intimate than eye contact anyway. Anybody can look at you. It’s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.

Editorial Reviews

- Featured on Fresh Air, Studio 360, Good Morning Amercia, The TODAY Show“This novel is by far [Green’s] most difficult to read. It’s also his most astonishing. . . . So surprising and moving and true that I became completely unstrung. . . . One needn’t be suffering like Aza to identify with it. One need only be human.”—The New York Times“A tender story about learning to cope when the world feels out of control.” – People“Green finds the language to describe the indescribable. . . . A must-read for those struggling with mental illness, or for their friends and family.” —San Francisco Chronicle“A powerful tale for teens (and adults) about anxiety, love and friendship.” —The Los Angeles Times“Turtles delivers a lesson that we so desperately need right now: Yes, it is okay not to be okay…. John Green has crafted a dynamic novel that is deeply honest, sometimes painful, and always thoughtful.” – Mashable“Green does more than write about; he endeavours to write inside…. No matter where you are on the spiral—and we’re all somewhere—Green’s novel makes the trip, either up or down, a less solitary experience.” – The Globe and Mail“A thoughtful look at mental illness and a debilitating obsessive-compulsive disorder that doesn’t ask but makes you feel the constant struggles of its main character. . . . Turtles explores the definition of happy endings, whether love is a tragedy or a failure, and a universal lesson for us all: ‘You work with what you have.’” – USA Today“A wrenching and revelatory novel.” – The New York Times “Tender, wise, and hopeful.” – The Wall Street Journal“A new modern classic.” – The Guardian“Green’s most authentic and most ambitious work to date.” – Bustle“An existential teenage scream.” – Vox“Funny, clever, and populated with endearing characters.” – Entertainment Weekly“An incredibly powerful tale of the pain of mental illness, the pressures of youth, and coming of age when you feel like you’re coming undone.” – Shelf Awareness★ “A richly rewarding read…the most mature of Green’s work to date and deserving of all the accolades that are sure to come its way.” – Booklist★ “In an age where troubling events happen almost weekly, this deeply empathetic novel about learning to live with demons and love one’s imperfect self is timely and important.” – Publishers Weekly★ “A deeply resonant and powerful novel that will inform and enlighten readers even as it breaks their hearts. A must-buy.” – School Library Journal  Praise for John Green- 50 million books in print worldwide - #1 New York Times Bestseller #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller #1 USA Today Bestseller #1 International Bestseller ★ Michael L. Printz Award Winner★ Michael L. Printz Honor Winner ★ Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist★ TIME 100 Most Influential People★ Forbes Celebrity 100 ★ NPR's 100 Best-Ever Teen Novels ★ TIME Magazine's 100 Best Young Adult Books of All TimeCritical acclaim for The Fault in Our Stars:   “Damn near genius . . . The Fault in Our Stars is a love story, one of the most genuine and moving ones in recent American fiction, but it’s also an existential tragedy of tremendous intelligence and courage and sadness.” —Lev Grossman, TIME Magazine   “This is a book that breaks your heart—not by wearing it down, but by making it bigger until it bursts.” —The Atlantic  “Remarkable . . . A pitch-perfect, elegiac comedy.” —USA Today “[Green’s] voice is so compulsively readable that it defies categorization. You will be thankful for the little infinity you spend inside this book.” —NPR.org“John Green deftly mixes the profound and the quotidian in this tough, touching valentine to the human spirit.” —The Washington Post    “[Green] shows us true love—two teenagers helping and accepting each other through the most humiliating physical and emotional ordeals—and it is far more romantic than any sunset on the beach.” —New York Times Book Review