TWO FOR YOU, ONE FOR METWO FOR YOU, ONE FOR ME

TWO FOR YOU, ONE FOR ME

Hardcover | July 27, 2018

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   A mother and son wander aimlessly in the late 1920s through Arizona and Mexico border-town poverty, homeless, with no life direction. In the early 1930s the son, through life’s happenstance of meeting one man, he discovers a better way that people can live and exist in a loving family. Finally free from his mother's control, his life begins anew. Ultimately, in 1937, the state of Arizona reunites him with extended family living in Tucson. This time period and these locations provide the beginning settings for a memoir that takes the reader through this child’s transition from young boyhood surviving on the streets, into early manhood; in the late 1930s, along with friends, joining the Civilian Conservation Corps, then enlisting into the U.S. Army in the Fall of 1940;  with the outbreak of the second world war being stationed in Seattle, Washington, helping his antiaircraft battery defend Boeing’s B-17 bomber production; then assuming new roles of a husband and father before going overseas for the invasion of Japan. After war’s end he becomes a new civilian living with his wife and growing family in the city of Seattle, happily working several years for Seattle City Light. During the late 1950s when a family friend continues to encourage him to make a change to the profession of selling residential real estate, he succumbs and somewhat unknowingly chooses the opportunity. Unfourtunately, opportunities can be a wolf in sheep’s clothing, as his life changing choices take him and his family down unfamiliar roads and social influences that alter the future course of all of the family’s lives.

Title:TWO FOR YOU, ONE FOR MEFormat:HardcoverProduct dimensions:324 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.88 inShipping dimensions:9 × 6 × 0.88 inPublished:July 27, 2018Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1732109508

ISBN - 13:9781732109506

Reviews

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

 

SON’S PROLOGUE

xi

 

 

FATHER’S INTRODUCTION

xxi

 

 

PART ONE

1927–1933

The Toughest Years—Two Insignificant People

Living Insignificant Lives

- 1 -

 

Vergara Family Photographs

- 46 -

 

Images of Cities and Towns Routinely Visited

- 51 -

 

 

PART TWO

1934–1936

The Mendoza Family—A New Beginning

- 61 –

 

 

PART THREE

April 1939– September 1940

The Civilian Conservation Corps —

Discipline, Responsibility, Manhood

- 81 -

 

 

PART FOUR

October 1940–November 1941

An Army Life Takes Me Further from My Roots and Culture;

Speaking English Is an Army Requirement

- 109 –

 

 

PART FIVE

December 1941–March 1942

Attack on Pearl Harbor Changes Everything and the

Course of My Life to Follow

- 141 -

 

 

PART SIX

April 1942–Spring 1944

A Blind Date Leads to Marriage and a Life That Grounds Me

- 161 -

 

Humphreys Family Photographs

- 183 -

 

My Father’s Service Photographs

- 187 –

 

 

PART SEVEN

Summer 1944–November 1945

The Pacific War Intensifies and Overseas Duty Calls Me

- 191 -

 

 

PART EIGHT

December 1945–1952

A Homecoming to Remember; My Civilian Life Begins

- 221 -

 

 

PART NINE

1953–1975

More Good Memories; I Transition from Blue Collar to White Collar

Employment; My Personal Life Choices of Family Consequence

- 259 –

 

Hernandez Family Memories

- 283-

 

 

SON’S EPILOGUE 

- 295 -

Editorial Reviews

      Kirkus  ReviewsA posthumous debut autobiography supplemented with photographs and commentary by the author’s son.Hernandez, who died in 2012, was born in 1922, in Nogales, Arizona, one of several towns near the Mexican border that would define the early years of his life. By 1927, his father, Edmundo, had deserted his mother, Guadalupe, and she became an alcoholic. She and her son wandered through border towns, mainly in the Mexican state of Sonora. Although she had family members willing to help in Nogales, Mexico, and in Arizona, she was unwilling to stay put: “my mother did not want them meddling in her life, so she stayed as far away from them as she could.” Frequently, the author was left to his own devices, sometimes for days or weeks. His life changed dramatically in 1934, when he was 12 and homeless. He met a man named Miguel Mendoza at the Agua Prieta border crossing, who brought him back to Douglas, Arizona, and had him declared a ward of the state; he and his wife raised Hernandez until 1936, when the state reassigned custody to his grandparents in Tucson. His initial experiences with instability motivated him to build a productive life as an adult. Extensive descriptions of his time in the Civilian Conservation Corps, his five years in the U.S. Army, his civilian work, marriage, and family life present unique glimpses into prewar and postwar Americana. The author’s youngest child, Anthony, encouraged him to write down the secrets of his early life, which he’d carried with him in silence for decades. The resulting articulate and emotional prose is generally optimistic, but often heartbreaking: My mother and I must have been quite a sight. Here was a woman, obviously drunk, pulling a sobbing kid, maybe hungry or sick, surely scared, and in my heart embarrassed for the both of us.” Although composed primarily for family members, the story offers a detailed geographical and cultural portrait of the border towns during the Great Depression.The relative ease with which one could cross back and forth between the two countries stands in poignant contrast to today’s reality.A raw, honest, and sad memoir.