Two Old Women, 20th Anniversary Edition: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival by Velma WallisTwo Old Women, 20th Anniversary Edition: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival by Velma Wallis

Two Old Women, 20th Anniversary Edition: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival

byVelma Wallis

Paperback | November 5, 2013

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Based on an Athabascan Indian legend passed along for many generations from mothers to daughters of the upper Yukon River Valley in Alaska, this is the suspenseful, shocking, ultimately inspirational tale of two old women abandoned by their tribe during a brutal winter famine.

Though these women have been known to complain more than contribute, they now must either survive on their own or die trying. In simple but vivid detail, Velma Wallis depicts a landscape and way of life that are at once merciless and starkly beautiful. In her old women, she has created two heroines of steely determination whose story of betrayal, friendship, community, and forgiveness "speaks straight to the heart with clarity, sweetness, and wisdom" (Ursula K. Le Guin).

Velma Wallis is one in a family of thirteen children, all born in the vast fur-trapping country of Fort Yukon, Alaska, and raised with traditional Athabascan values. A writer and avid reader, she lives in Fairbanks.
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Title:Two Old Women, 20th Anniversary Edition: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and SurvivalFormat:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 7.12 × 5 × 0.4 inPublished:November 5, 2013Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0062244981

ISBN - 13:9780062244987

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Gorgeous story This is a beautiful story about two "useless" old women who are left behind by their tribe during a period of famine. Alone, without the support of their friends and family, they are forced to learn how to care for themselves again. And they do, and then they are able to use the knowledge they gain through their new-found self-sufficiency to save the tribe that had once abandoned them. The moral lessons are complex, and sometimes a little troubling to my modern sensibilities, but I just couldn't get enough of these two characters - their friendship, tested through the trials of survival, was completely three dimensional in a way that modern novels often fail to convey.
Date published: 2018-02-08