U.ess.ay: Politics And Humanity In American Film by Stephen Lee NaishU.ess.ay: Politics And Humanity In American Film by Stephen Lee Naish

U.ess.ay: Politics And Humanity In American Film

byStephen Lee Naish

Paperback | January 7, 2014

Pricing and Purchase Info

$18.95

Earn 95 plum® points

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

U.ESS.AY: Politics and Humanity in American Film collects together the published essays of Stephen Lee Naish, into a narrative that explores the political and humanistic elements of modern cinema. With the rise of digital technology and the excessive use of CGI currently overwhelming cinema, realism and humanity have been dispensed with in favor of spectacle and illusion. It is the goal of U.ESS.AY to find within modern cinema contents that address the cultural and political landscape
Stephen Lee Naish grew up in Leicester, UK but now lives in Ontario, Canada were he writes about film, politics and popular culture and the places were they converge. His writing has appeared in numerous journals and periodicals.
Deconstructing Dirty Dancing
Deconstructing Dirty Dancing

by Stephen Lee Naish

$11.70$15.95

In stock online

Not available in stores

Create Or Die: Essays On The Artistry Of Dennis Hopper
Create Or Die: Essays On The Artistry Of Dennis Hopper

by Stephen Lee Naish

$48.95

Ships within 3-5 weeks

Not available in stores

Title:U.ess.ay: Politics And Humanity In American FilmFormat:PaperbackDimensions:97 pages, 8.58 × 5.45 × 0.24 inPublished:January 7, 2014Publisher:Zero BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:178279378X

ISBN - 13:9781782793786

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of U.ess.ay: Politics And Humanity In American Film

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

In this book, Stephen Lee Naish gives a discerning look at American film and popular culture over the course of the last half-century. Moving from Dennis Hopper to David Cronenberg, from the robot sexuality of Star Trek to the aesthetic aspirations of North Korean dictators, and from low-budget "mumblecore" production to Hollywood's disaster-movie blockbusters, Naish shows postmodern cinema as a funhouse mirror reflecting all sorts of quintessentially American (and anti-American) compulsions.--Steven Shaviro, Author of Post Cinimatic Affect, Zero Books -