Ulysses by James Joyce

Ulysses

byJames Joyce

Kobo ebook | November 27, 2011

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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed. A yellow dressinggown, ungirdled, was sustained gently behind him on the mild morning air. He held the bowl aloft and intoned:
Title:UlyssesFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:November 27, 2011Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:2819917941

ISBN - 13:9782819917946

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this book! Yes, this book it so very confusing to read, especially by the end of it when there ceases to be any notion of rules, but it truly is a work of art! I've read this book quite a few times and each time I read it, I find a new detail that I missed! However, you have to put in some effort for sure, it was on my friend's English course reading list for a reason...
Date published: 2018-08-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Difficult Read This will be the hardest book that you will ever try to read but the journey is absolutely worth the pain and confusion. The book earns its reputation and its infamy.
Date published: 2018-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ulysses by James Joyce Death, and its shadow, seemed to haunt the early part of the writing. What is this end we are pushing towards? Is it an end? Can we even call it painful? The idea it conveys is that time, at least time according to human perception, pushes singularly towards this phenomenon: the ultimate truth of life. Ulysses is deeply symbolic. This haunting can be read as a decay of the state, the breakdown of society (its traditions and values) as it enters a new modern era. The old structures of civilisation are dying, the world is changing, art is changing, thought is changing and perhaps this is what Ulysses represents in some sense. Perhaps this new creature of literature is the very essence of this new dawn, of the modernist art movement, or perhaps I have simply been swayed by one of the many nuanced impressions within the work, the subtle hints and suggestions that can be ready in so many different ways. Sometimes reading a Great Work of Literature is like drinking fine French wine, say an aged Burgundy or Mersault. Everyone tells you how amazing it is, and on an intellectual level you can appreciate the brilliance, the subtlety, the refinement.
Date published: 2018-04-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ulysses by James Joyce Death, and its shadow, seemed to haunt the early part of the writing. What is this end we are pushing towards? Is it an end? Can we even call it painful? The idea it conveys is that time, at least time according to human perception, pushes singularly towards this phenomenon: the ultimate truth of life. Ulysses is deeply symbolic. This haunting can be read as a decay of the state, the breakdown of society (its traditions and values) as it enters a new modern era. The old structures of civilisation are dying, the world is changing, art is changing, thought is changing and perhaps this is what Ulysses represents in some sense. Perhaps this new creature of literature is the very essence of this new dawn, of the modernist art movement, or perhaps I have simply been swayed by one of the many nuanced impressions within the work, the subtle hints and suggestions that can be ready in so many different ways. Sometimes reading a Great Work of Literature is like drinking fine French wine, say an aged Burgundy or Mersault. Everyone tells you how amazing it is, and on an intellectual level you can appreciate the brilliance, the subtlety, the refinement.
Date published: 2018-04-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ulysses by James Joyce Death, and its shadow, seemed to haunt the early part of the writing. What is this end we are pushing towards? Is it an end? Can we even call it painful? The idea it conveys is that time, at least time according to human perception, pushes singularly towards this phenomenon: the ultimate truth of life. Ulysses is deeply symbolic. This haunting can be read as a decay of the state, the breakdown of society (its traditions and values) as it enters a new modern era. The old structures of civilisation are dying, the world is changing, art is changing, thought is changing and perhaps this is what Ulysses represents in some sense. Perhaps this new creature of literature is the very essence of this new dawn, of the modernist art movement, or perhaps I have simply been swayed by one of the many nuanced impressions within the work, the subtle hints and suggestions that can be ready in so many different ways. Sometimes reading a Great Work of Literature is like drinking fine French wine, say an aged Burgundy or Mersault. Everyone tells you how amazing it is, and on an intellectual level you can appreciate the brilliance, the subtlety, the refinement.
Date published: 2018-04-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not a fan of the book. However it is one of those books you must read at least once in your life.
Date published: 2017-06-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The best? I've read this three times, and it does get better each time. I look forward to reading it again.
Date published: 2016-12-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worth the effort If the idea of needing to have a working understanding of Homer's The Odyssey, Shakespeare 's Hamlet and Brit/Irish relations before even starting on this tome is off-putting to you, stay away from this book. But, if you are willing to put in the effort you'll be rewarded with the epitome of the modernist novel that wanders through nearly every formal style.
Date published: 2016-11-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Edition This is a really good edition. Chapter Headings are missing because it is the original 1922 edition. There are, however, good charts in the back. I don't like the notes in the back, however good they may be. It IS fun writing in notes and symbols, etc, though. Makes me really study it seriously. Good price, too and easy fonts to read.
Date published: 2010-03-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The ultimate modernist work For anyone serious about modern literature, Ulysses is required reading. Of course, you're not required to enjoy it. One of the densest novels ever written, Ulysses bursts with references and styles that will confound even the hardiest reader. Not entirely enjoyable, but unlike any other book.
Date published: 2002-10-10