Understanding Counterfactuals, Understanding Causation: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology

Paperback | November 6, 2011

EditorChristoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack, Sarah R. Beck

not yet rated|write a review
How are causal judgements such as 'The ice on the road caused the traffic accident' connected with counterfactual judgements such as 'If there had not been any ice on the road, the traffic accident would not have happened'? This volume throws new light on this question by uniting, for thefirst time, psychological and philosophical approaches to causation and counterfactuals. Traditionally, philosophers have primarily been interested in connections between causal and counterfactual claims on the level of meaning or truth-conditions. More recently, however, they have also increasingly turned their attention to psychological connections between causal and counterfactualunderstanding or reasoning. At the same time, there has been a surge in interest in empirical work on causal and counterfactual cognition amongst developmental, cognitive, and social psychologists--much of it inspired by work in philosophy. In this volume, twelve original contributions from leading philosophers and psychologists explore in detail what bearing empirical findings might have on philosophical concerns about counterfactuals and causation, and how, in turn, work in philosophy might help clarify the issues at stake inempirical work on the cognitive underpinnings of, and relationships between, causal and counterfactual thought.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$47.50

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

How are causal judgements such as 'The ice on the road caused the traffic accident' connected with counterfactual judgements such as 'If there had not been any ice on the road, the traffic accident would not have happened'? This volume throws new light on this question by uniting, for thefirst time, psychological and philosophical appr...

Christoph Hoerl is Associate Professor (Reader) in Philosophy at the University of Warwick. Between 2004 and 2008, he was co-director (with Teresa McCormack and Johannes Roessler) of the interdisciplinary AHRC Research Project 'Causal Understanding: Empirical and Theoretical Foundations for a New Approach'. With Teresa McCormack and S...

other books by Christoph Hoerl

Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology
Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues ...

Hardcover|Feb 15 2005

$233.08 online$322.50list price(save 27%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:November 6, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019969513X

ISBN - 13:9780199695133

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Understanding Counterfactuals, Understanding Causation: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack, Sarah Beck: Introduction: Understanding Counterfactuals and Causation2. James Woodward: Psychological Studies of Causal and Counterfactual Reasoning3. Teresa McCormack, Caren Frosch, Patrick Burns: The Relationship between Children's Causal and Counterfactual Judgments4. Johannes Roessler: Perceptual Causality, Counterfactuals, and Special Causal Concepts5. Josef Perner and Eva Rafetseder: Counterfactual and Other Forms of Conditional Reasoning: Children Lost in the Nearest Possible World6. Sarah Beck, Kevin Riggs, Patrick Burns: Multiple Developments in Counterfactual Thinking7. David Sobel: Domain-Specific Causal Knowledge and Children's Reasoning about Possibility8. David Mandel: Mental Simulation and the Nexus of Causal and Counterfactual Explanation9. Christopher Hitchcock: Counterfactual Availability and Causal Judgement10. Peter Menzies: The Role of Counterfactual Dependence in Causal Judgements11. Ruth Byrne: Counterfactual and Causal Thoughts about Exceptional Events12. Dorothy Edgington: Causation First: Why Causation is Prior to Counterfactuals13. Aidan Feeney and Simon Handley: Suppositions, Conditionals, and Causal Claims