Understanding the Risk Society: Crime, Security and Justice

Paperback | May 15, 2014

byGabriel Mythen

not yet rated|write a review
In this penetrating account of the impacts of risk on everyday life, Gabe Mythen provides a theoretically informed overview of the regulation of crime and security in a globalized world. By explicating the relationships between risk and crime, security and justice, the text applies risk to specific incidents and events, scrutinizing social processes and cultural practices, and illumining some of the central social and political issues of the modern age.

Extending across a range of domains – including law, the environment, media and politics – Mythen embarks on a conceptual and critical exploration of risk theory. In doing so, his incisive text presents both a critical evaluation of the efficacy of competing perspectives on risk, and an authoritative appraisal of the place of risk within the social sciences.
 

Pricing and Purchase Info

$51.99

Ships within 1-2 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

In this penetrating account of the impacts of risk on everyday life, Gabe Mythen provides a theoretically informed overview of the regulation of crime and security in a globalized world. By explicating the relationships between risk and crime, security and justice, the text applies risk to specific incidents and events, scrutinizing so...

Gabe Mythen is Reader in Sociology at the University of Liverpool, UK.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 8.68 × 5.84 × 0.5 inPublished:May 15, 2014Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230555322

ISBN - 13:9780230555327

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Understanding the Risk Society: Crime, Security and Justice

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. The Turn to Risk
2. Theorizing Risk
3. Crime, Risk and Governance
4. Fear, Victimization and the Media
5. Terrorism, Risk and Regulation
6. The Environment, Risk and Harm
7. Contesting Risk
Conclusion