Unionist Voices and the Politics of Remembering the Past in Northern Ireland by Kirk SimpsonUnionist Voices and the Politics of Remembering the Past in Northern Ireland by Kirk Simpson

Unionist Voices and the Politics of Remembering the Past in Northern Ireland

byKirk Simpson

Hardcover | August 21, 2009

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In this book, Simpson offers a reflective and theoretical explanation of the ways in which unionists conceive of the past in the present post-conflict environment. He considers the ways in which scholarly literature has often painted an outdated and inaccurate portrait of a highly complex people.
KIRK SIMPSON is RCUK Post Doctoral Fellow at the Transitional Justice Institute at University of Ulster, UK. He has written extensively in prestigious academic journals on truth recovery, victims of political violence and unionists in Northern Ireland. He is also the author of the book Truth Recovery in Northern Ireland: Critically In...
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Title:Unionist Voices and the Politics of Remembering the Past in Northern IrelandFormat:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0 inPublished:August 21, 2009Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230224148

ISBN - 13:9780230224148

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Table of Contents

Thematic Introduction and Background to the Northern Ireland Conflict * Unionists, Memory and Subjectivist Constructions of the Political Other * Recalling the Adjustment to Political Violence
* Unionist Remembrance of Political Violence and Suffering in Northern Ireland * The Disappearance of Unionist Storytelling and the Conflict * Truth Recovery, Unionists and Social Memory *
Conclusion: Mastering the Past in Northern Ireland

Editorial Reviews

"How Northern Ireland deals with its past is a major issue for Northern Irelands future. So this book could not be more important. It is written with passion but without partisanship, with academic rigour but without pedantry. The result is a powerful yet sensitive evocation of Unionist anxieties and historical sensitivities, disturbing but always moving." -- Arthur Aughey, Professor of Politics, University of Ulster, UK