United States-japan Trade In Telecommunications: Conflict And Compromise

Hardcover | March 1, 1993

EditorMeheroo Jussawalla

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This volume, which grew out of a study conducted by the East-West Center, analyzes the friction in telecommunications trade between the United States and Japan and the consequent imposition of the Super 301 clause on Japan. Giving both the U.S. and Japanese viewpoints, the book discusses trade in telecommunications and the events that led to the Super 301 clause and the Strategic Impediments Initiative. It also provides an in-depth analysis of GATT issues and what may be expected from the current Uruguay Round. Telecommunications deregulation and privatization in both countries are carefully assessed as are the social, policial, and cultural implications of the trade conflict, which led to President Bush's recent visit to Japan. The first book to focus specifically on trade in communications equipment between the United States and Japan, the volume fills a critical gap in the literature.

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This volume, which grew out of a study conducted by the East-West Center, analyzes the friction in telecommunications trade between the United States and Japan and the consequent imposition of the Super 301 clause on Japan. Giving both the U.S. and Japanese viewpoints, the book discusses trade in telecommunications and the events that ...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:March 1, 1993Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:031328718X

ISBN - 13:9780313287183

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.,."Excellent descriptions of national policies affecting telecommunications and of the trade flows thereof....Most valuable as a reference work on an increasingly critical sector."-Economic Strategy Institute