University Coeducation In The Victorian Era: Inclusion in the United States and the United Kingdom by C. MyersUniversity Coeducation In The Victorian Era: Inclusion in the United States and the United Kingdom by C. Myers

University Coeducation In The Victorian Era: Inclusion in the United States and the United Kingdom

byC. Myers, Christine D Myers

Hardcover | August 18, 2010

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University Coeducation in the Victorian Era chronicles the inclusion of women in state-supported male universities during the nineteenth century. Based on primary sources produced by the administrators, faculty, and students, or other contemporary Victorian writers, this book provides insight from multiple perspectives of an important step in the progress of gender relations in higher education and society at large. By studying twelve institutions in the United States, and another twelve in the United Kingdom, the comparative scope of the work is substantial and brings local, regional, national, and international questions together, while not losing sight of individual university student experiences.
CHRISTINE MYERS is Education Instructor at Lourdes College, USA and Adjunct Professor of Education at Franklin University, USA.
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Title:University Coeducation In The Victorian Era: Inclusion in the United States and the United KingdomFormat:HardcoverDimensions:283 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.83 inPublished:August 18, 2010Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230622372

ISBN - 13:9780230622371

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Table of Contents

The Process of Inclusion Victorian Views of Coeducation Administration& Legislation Academic Student Life Facilitating Coeducation Extracurricular Student Life Student Publications Life After Graduation Drawing Conclusions