Unsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily Carr by Moray, GertaUnsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily Carr by Moray, Gerta

Unsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily Carr

byMoray, Gerta

Hardcover | June 1, 2006

Pricing and Purchase Info

$51.60 online 
$75.00 list price save 31%
Earn 258 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Unsettling Encounters radically re-examines Emily Carr’s achievement in representing Native life on the Northwest Coast in her painting and writing. By reconstructing a neglected body of Carr’s work that was central in shaping her vision and career, it makes possible a new assessment of her significance as a leading figure in early-twentieth-century North American modernism.

Gerta Moray vividly recreates the rapidly changing historical and social circumstances in which the artist painted and wrote. Carr lived and worked in British Columbia at a time when the growing settler population was rapidly taking over and developing the land and its resources. Moray argues that Carr’s work takes on its full significance only when it is seen as a conscious intervention in Native-settler relations. She examines the work in the context of images of Native peoples then being constructed by missionaries and anthropologists and exploited by promoters of world’s fairs and museums. Carr’s famous, highly expressive later paintings were based to a great extent on her early experiences of travel to First Nations communities. At the same time they were a response to the hopes and anxieties that attended the rapid modernization of North American culture in the 1920s and ’30s.

Moray explores Carr’s participation, with the Group of Seven, in an agenda of building a national culture and her sense of her own position as a woman artist in this masculine arena. Unsettling Encounters is the definitive study of Carr’s ‘Indian’ images, locating them within both the local context of Canadian history and the wider international currents of visual culture.

Gerta Moray is a professor of Art History at the University of Guelph. She has previously taught at the Universities of Sheffield, Edinburgh, Stirling, and Toronto.
Loading
Title:Unsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily CarrFormat:HardcoverDimensions:400 pages, 12.27 × 8.98 × 1.49 inPublished:June 1, 2006Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774812826

ISBN - 13:9780774812825

Reviews

Table of Contents

Foreword / Marcia Crosby

Places Painted by Emily Carr

Part 1: Contexts for a Colonial Artist

1 The Legendary Emily Carr

2 Drawing and Insubordination

3 Missionary in Reverse

4 Among Ethnographers and Indian Agents

Part 2: A Pictorial Record of Native Villages and Totem Poles, 1899-1913

5 They Named Me Klee Wyck

6 The Despised and Joyous Way of Painting

7 Old Mythological Legends: Gitxsan Villages in 1912

8 A Great Dignity: Haida Gwaii in 1912

9 Unchanged by Fashion and Civilization: Kwakwaka’wakw Villages in 1912

10 The Largest Collection Yet Made: Carr’s 1913 Exhibition in Vancouver and Its Aftermath

Part 3: Homesick for Indian

11 Out of the Wilderness and into the National Gallery

12 What They Are Trying to Forget: Sketching Trips from 1928

13 The Big Thing That Means Canada Herself

14 Retrospect

Notes; Bibliographic; Essay; Index

Editorial Reviews

Unsettling Encounters radically re-examines Emily Carr’s achievement in representing Native life on the Northwest Coast in her painting and writing. By reconstructing a neglected body of Carr’s work that was central in shaping her vision and career, it makes possible a new assessment of her significance as a leading figure in early-twentieth-century North American modernism. Gerta Moray vividly recreates the rapidly changing historical and social circumstances in which the artist painted and wrote. Carr lived and worked in British Columbia at a time when the growing settler population was rapidly taking over and developing the land and its resources. Moray argues that Carr’s work takes on its full significance only when it is seen as a conscious intervention in Native-settler relations. She examines the work in the context of images of Native peoples then being constructed by missionaries and anthropologists and exploited by promoters of world’s fairs and museums.Gerta Moray’s extensive survey of Carr’s early documentary work of Native peoples is important because it discusses Carr’s attempt to record, for history and for art, Aboriginal culture and her experiences with “them.” Moray underlines that Carr did so in ways that reflected the limitations of her comprehension not only of Aboriginal people but also of the sociopolitical and cultural circumstances she encountered. - from the Foreword by Marcia Crosby, writer and instructor in English and Native Studies, Malaspina University