Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border by Edward S. Casey

Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border

byEdward S. Casey, Mary Watkins

Paperback | September 1, 2014

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Winner, National Association for Ethnic Studies (NAES) Outstanding Book Award, 2017

As increasing global economic disparities, violence, and climate change provoke a rising tide of forced migration, many countries and local communities are responding by building walls—literal and metaphorical—between citizens and newcomers. Up Against the Wall: Re-imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border examines the temptation to construct such walls through a penetrating analysis of the U.S. wall at the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as investigating the walling out of Mexicans in local communities. Calling into question the building of a wall against a friendly neighboring nation, Up Against the Wall offers an analysis of the differences between borders and boundaries. This analysis opens the way to envisioning alternatives to the stark and policed divisions that are imposed by walls of all kinds. Tracing the consequences of imperialism and colonization as citizens grapple with new migrant neighbors, the book paints compelling examples from key locales affected by the wall—Nogales, Arizona vs. Nogales, Sonora; Tijuana/San Diego; and the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. An extended case study of Santa Barbara describes the creation of an internal colony in the aftermath of the U.S. conquest of Mexican land, a history that is relevant to many U.S. cities and towns.

Ranging from human rights issues in the wake of massive global migration to the role of national restorative shame in the United States for the treatment of Mexicans since 1848, the authors delve into the broad repercussions of the unjust and often tragic consequences of excluding others through walled structures along with the withholding of citizenship and full societal inclusion. Through the lens of a detailed examination of forced migration from Mexico to the United States, this transdisciplinary text, drawing on philosophy, psychology, and political theory, opens up multiple insights into how nations and communities can coexist with more justice and more compassion.

About The Author

EDWARD S. CASEY is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at State University of New York, Stony Brook, and the author of several acclaimed books, among them Getting Back into Place and The World at a Glance. MARY WATKINS is Professor of Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Santa Barbara, California, where she also serves as d...
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Details & Specs

Title:Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the U.S.-Mexico BorderFormat:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 9 × 6.05 × 1 inPublished:September 1, 2014Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:029275938X

ISBN - 13:9780292759381

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part 1. Re-viewing La Frontera: Borders versus Boundaries

1. La Frontera as Border and Boundary
2. Ambos Nogales: A Tale of Two Cities
3. Tijuana: The Wall and the Estuary
4. Wall and River in the Lower Rio Grande Valley
Postlude 1. Walled Up and Walled Out

Part 2. Looking Both Ways at the Border

Prelude to Part 2. Friendship Park: First Encounter
5. The Creation of an Internal Colony: Santa Barbara, a City Divided against Itself
6. Juan Crow: The American Ethnoracial Caste System and the Criminalization of Mexican Migrants
7. The Souls of Anglos
8. Border-Wall Art as Limit Acts
9. Creating Communities of Hospitality: Growing Connective Tissue between Immigrants and Citizens
Postlude 2. Gaining Access to the Heart of Our Home

Epilogue: From Standing in the Shadows of Walls to Imagining Them Otherwise

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

Winner, National Association for Ethnic Studies (NAES) Outstanding Book Award, 2017As increasing global economic disparities, violence, and climate change provoke a rising tide of forced migration, many countries and local communities are responding by building walls—literal and metaphorical—between citizens and newcomers. Up Against the Wall: Re-imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border examines the temptation to construct such walls through a penetrating analysis of the U.S. wall at the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as investigating the walling out of Mexicans in local communities. Calling into question the building of a wall against a friendly neighboring nation, Up Against the Wall offers an analysis of the differences between borders and boundaries. This analysis opens the way to envisioning alternatives to the stark and policed divisions that are imposed by walls of all kinds. Tracing the consequences of imperialism and colonization as citizens grapple with new migrant neighbors, the book paints compelling examples from key locales affected by the wall—Nogales, Arizona vs. Nogales, Sonora; Tijuana/San Diego; and the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. An extended case study of Santa Barbara describes the creation of an internal colony in the aftermath of the U.S. conquest of Mexican land, a history that is relevant to many U.S. cities and towns.Ranging from human rights issues in the wake of massive global migration to the role of national restorative shame in the United States for the treatment of Mexicans since 1848, the authors delve into the broad repercussions of the unjust and often tragic consequences of excluding others through walled structures along with the withholding of citizenship and full societal inclusion. Through the lens of a detailed examination of forced migration from Mexico to the United States, this transdisciplinary text, drawing on philosophy, psychology, and political theory, opens up multiple insights into how nations and communities can coexist with more justice and more compassion."Stunning in the insights it unearths. . . . [provides] impressive, timely scholarship in this era of great concern about migrancy and the increased proximity among peoples created by globalization." - Fred Evans, Professor of Philosophy, Duquesne University