Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black-Latino Coalitions in New York City from Protest to Public Office

Hardcover | December 2, 2014

byFrederick Douglass Opie

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Upsetting the Apple Cart surveys the history of black-Latino coalitions in New York City from 1959 to 1989. In those years, African American and Latino Progressives organized, mobilized, and transformed neighborhoods, workplaces, university campuses, and representative government in the nation's urban capital.

Upsetting the Apple Cart makes new contributions to our understanding of protest movements and strikes in the 1960s and 1970s and reveals the little-known role of left-of-center organizations in New York City politics as well as the influence of Jesse Jackson's 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns on city elections. Frederick Douglass Opie provides a social history of black and Latino working-class collaboration in shared living and work spaces and exposes racist suspicion and divisive jockeying among elites in political clubs and anti-poverty programs. He ultimately offers a different interpretation of the story of the labor, student, civil rights, and Black Power movements than has been traditionally told. His work highlights both the largely unknown agents of historic change in the city and the noted politicians, political strategists, and union leaders whose careers were built on this history. Also, as Napoleon said, "An army marches on its stomach," and Opie's history equally delves into the role that food plays in social movements, with representative recipes from the American South and the Caribbean included throughout.

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Upsetting the Apple Cart surveys the history of black-Latino coalitions in New York City from 1959 to 1989. In those years, African American and Latino Progressives organized, mobilized, and transformed neighborhoods, workplaces, university campuses, and representative government in the nation's urban capital. Upsetting the Apple Cart...

Frederick Douglass Opie is a professor of history and foodways at Babson College. He is the author of Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America and Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala, 1882-1923, and the editor of the history and food blog www.foodasalens.com.

other books by Frederick Douglass Opie

Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America
Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America

Kobo ebook|Oct 27 2008

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:312 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:December 2, 2014Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231149409

ISBN - 13:9780231149402

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Read the introduction to Upsetting the Apple Cart:

Table of Contents

A Note on SourcesAbbreviationsIntroduction1. Journeys: Black and Latino Relations, 1930-19702. Upsetting the Apple Cart: Black and Puerto Rican Hospital Workers, 1959-19623. Developing Their Minds Without Losing Their Souls: Black and Latino Student Coalition Building, 1965-19694. Young Turks: Progressive Activists and Organizations, 1970-19855. Coalition Politics, 1982-1984: The Chicago Plan6. Where the Street Goes, the Suits Follow: Coalition Politics, 1985-19887. Latinos for Dinkins in 1989: The Coalition's Complicated VictoryConclusionNotesIndex

Editorial Reviews

Upsetting the Apple Cart outlines for the first time an important part of American working-class history and race relations. Frederick Douglass Opie's narrative delineates how black and Latino coalitions supported by organized labor can become a formula to attain power. He focuses on how these coalitions work and how they become contentious based on mutual suspicions. Provocative and engaging.