Urban Encounters: Affirmative Action and Black Identities in Brazil by A. CicaloUrban Encounters: Affirmative Action and Black Identities in Brazil by A. Cicalo

Urban Encounters: Affirmative Action and Black Identities in Brazil

byA. Cicalo

Hardcover | September 25, 2012

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Winner of the Latin American Studies Association Brazil Section Book Awards.   Utilizing an ethnographic study of a public university and its users, Cicalo analyzes the practical and symbolic potential that affirmative action has to redress historically-produced and territorialized inequalities in the urban space.
André Cicalo is Post-Doctoral at Freie Universität, Germany
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Title:Urban Encounters: Affirmative Action and Black Identities in BrazilFormat:HardcoverDimensions:229 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.75 inPublished:September 25, 2012Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230338526

ISBN - 13:9780230338524

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Table of Contents

Toward an Ethnographic Study of Racial Quotas for 'Black' Students in the University of the State of Rio de Janeiro Dreams and Hard Places: Main Settings and Socioeconomic Profile of Quota Students Race Between the Class Rows: Urban Encounters and Dis-Encounters in the Changing University Space From Race or Color to Race and Color? Ethnography beyond Official Discourses Narrowing Political Gaps: Black Awareness and University Education as Ways to be 'Central'

Editorial Reviews

"Cicalo's work is highly original and is the most thoughtful treatment of university quotas in Brazil yet written. This perspective is of considerable importance because of the light it sheds on the process as it is unfolding on the ground and in real time. His ideas for policy implications are interesting and suggestive." - John Burdick, professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University