Us and Them?: The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Control

Paperback | June 28, 2015

byBridget Anderson

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Us and Them? explores the distinction between migrant and citizen through using the concept of "the community of value". The community of value is comprised of Good Citizens and is defined from outside by the Non-Citizen and from the inside by the Failed Citizen, that is figures like thebenefit scrounger, the criminal, the teenage mother etc. While Failed Citizens and Non-Citizens are often strongly differentiated, the book argues that it is analytically and politically productive to to consider them together. Judgments about who counts as skilled, what is a good marriage, who issuitable for citizenship, and what sort of enforcement is acceptable against "illegals", affect citizens as well as migrants. Rather than simple competitors for the privileges of membership, citizens and migrants define each other through sets of relations that shift and are not straightforwardbinaries. The first two chapters on vagrancy and on Empire historicise migration management by linking it to attempts to control the mobility of the poor. The following three chapters map and interrogate the concept of the "national labour market" and UK immigration and citizenship policies examining how theywork within public debate to produce "us and them". Chapters 6 and 7 go on to discuss the challenges posed by enforcement and deportation, and the attempt to make this compatible with liberalism through anti-trafficking policies. It ends with a case study of domestic labour as exemplifying the waysin which all the issues outlined above come together in the lives of migrants and their employers.

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Us and Them? explores the distinction between migrant and citizen through using the concept of "the community of value". The community of value is comprised of Good Citizens and is defined from outside by the Non-Citizen and from the inside by the Failed Citizen, that is figures like thebenefit scrounger, the criminal, the teenage moth...

Bridget Anderson is Professor of Migration and Citizenship, and Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), Oxford University. Bridget Anderson's research interests include low waged labour migration, deportation, legal status, and citizenship. Publications include Doing the Dirt...

other books by Bridget Anderson

Citizenship and its Others
Citizenship and its Others

Kobo ebook|Nov 2 2015

$86.09 online$111.79list price(save 22%)
see all books by Bridget Anderson
Format:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.5 inPublished:June 28, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198737610

ISBN - 13:9780198737612

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgementsList of AbbreviationsIntroduction: Citizenship And The Community Of Value: Exclusion, Failure, Tolerance1. A Chrysalis For Every Species Of Criminal?2. Subjects, Aliens, Citizens, Migrants3. Migration Management: Ending In Tiers4. "British Jobs for British Workers!": Migration and the UK Labour Market5. New Citizens: The Values of Belonging6. Uncivilised Others: Enforcement and Forced Exit7. Uncivilised Others: Rescuing Victims8. Immigration and Domestic Work: Between a Rock and a Hard Place9. Conclusion: Making the DifferenceBibliography

Editorial Reviews

"The book leaves anyone interested in justifications of eligibility in social policies motivated to maintain a critical debate about the very foundations of often taken-for-granted assumptions about deservingness, as well as the global and national distribution effects of particularexclusionary policy choices with regard to individual groups' rights, life chances and livelihoods. It certainly teaches us not to hide behind legal catagories and statuses or formal decision-making procedures in our analyses of policies and politics." --Regine Paul, Journal of Social Policy