Usage And Abusage by Eric PartridgeUsage And Abusage by Eric Partridge

Usage And Abusage

byEric Partridge

Paperback | December 1, 1997

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Which is preferred - nom de plume, pseudonym, or pen name? What are neologisms, disguised conjunctions, and fused participles? Language enters into almost every part of human life and yet it is all too often misused: directness and clarity disappear in a whirl of clichés, euphemisms, and wooliness of expression.

Janet Whitcut has revised Eric Partridge's popular reference book to reflect the language of well-informed writers, readers, and speakers today. She has also added a section to the book entitled "Vogue Words," which includes words that have acquired a new power and influence.
Janet Whitcut has contributed to many publications including The International Encyclopedia of Lexicography and The Oxford Thesaurus.
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Title:Usage And AbusageFormat:PaperbackDimensions:389 pages, 8.17 × 5.48 × 0.97 inPublished:December 1, 1997Publisher:W. W. Norton & Company

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393317099

ISBN - 13:9780393317091

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Reviews

From Our Editors

An updated edition of a useful, entertaining guide to picking the right words (and avoiding the wrong ones). Janet Whitcut has revised Eric Partridge's popular reference to reflect the language of well-informed writers, readers, and speakers today. The book also includes a section of "vogue words", those that have acquired a new power and influence. An indispensable reference

Editorial Reviews

Entertaining and informative. — Library Journal

Will be appreciated by language lovers, students, and writers. . . . It now reflects the language changes of the '90s, while retaining succinct and witty essays by Partridge on such subjects as ambiguity, euphemisms, jargon, negation, and puns. . . . A gem of linguistic information. — Chattanooga Free Press