V For Vendetta New (new Edition Tpb)

Paperback | October 24, 2008

byAlan MooreIllustratorDavid Lloyd

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A new trade paperback edition of the graphic novel that inspired the hit movie!

A powerful story about loss of freedom and individuality, V FOR VENDETTA takes place in a totalitarian England following a devastating war that changed the face of the planet.

In a world without political freedom, personal freedom and precious little faith in anything comes a mysterious man in a white porcelain mask who fights political oppressors through terrorism and seemingly absurd acts. It's a gripping tale of the blurred lines between ideological good and evil.

This new trade paperbackedition features the improved production values and coloring from the 2005 hardcover.

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From the Publisher

A new trade paperback edition of the graphic novel that inspired the hit movie!A powerful story about loss of freedom and individuality, V FOR VENDETTA takes place in a totalitarian England following a devastating war that changed the face of the planet. In a world without political freedom, personal freedom and precious little faith i...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 10.2 × 6.7 × 0.7 inPublished:October 24, 2008Publisher:DC ComicsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:140120841X

ISBN - 13:9781401208417

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Customer Reviews of V For Vendetta New (new Edition Tpb)

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Still relevant This story is arguably more relevant than ever. It examines the fine line between security vs freedom and at what point do we give up too much of the latter. Just do yourself a favour and read this novel.
Date published: 2016-12-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love It Great Book
Date published: 2016-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Best My favourite graphic novel. It messed with my mind and I couldn't stop thinking about it. A must read.
Date published: 2016-11-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Legendary This is a must read for anyone is a fan of graphic novels. V for Vendetta is so relevant today, now more than ever, and I think it served as an important learning tool for people to understand our society. It's great how ahead of the time this graphic novel was written, showing how much of a genius Alan Moore is. If you want a graphic novel that will help you to question the norm and what we think we know about how we govern our world, pick this up!
Date published: 2016-11-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Review for Netizenship project I really liked the novel and the intelligent writing by Allan Moore , it's definitely one of the most important graphic novels ever written. Although the slow paced narrative and the jump of events from time to time a bit annoyed me. Anarchy seems to be the whole idea of the novel and the fight against the fascist government in a post apocalyptic Britain. the art of the novel is pretty neat and David Lloyd character design for V is very revolutionary and iconic which we can see the impact of the mask of V today. Totally worth reading
Date published: 2012-03-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Superior Inferiority Alan Moore's V for Vendetta is to his Watchmen what Tolkien's Hobbit is to his Silmarillion: an inferior work of superior satisfaction. I should point out before going any further, however, that I am in no way suggesting V for Vendetta or The Hobbit are anything less than classics. As works of literature both are vastly superior to most books written, especially within their genres. They simply don't match the literary heights of their more lofty relations. But this is about V for Vendetta, so here's my take on its inferiority and superiority: to the Watchmen: Inferiority -- While both books are set in fascistic dystopias (either parallel or near future), Watchmen's world offers us greater depth of history, an engrossing mythology that raises the tales believability despite its fantastic elements, while working on multiple levels of theme, meaning and artistry. It is dark, sinister, unrelenting, hopeless and utterly genius. Superiority -- Yet V for Vendetta is no slouch as a work of art. After all, any story dealing with terrorism/freedom fighting in the last 25 years that dares to make the terrorist/freedom fighter a hero is a work worth reading. More importantly, however, V is a powerful and convincing character. S/he makes it clear that anarchy is not about chaos but a different form of order without law. S/he is a wounded being whose rage can be tempered with mercy; s/he is a teacher whose love can lead to the torture of her/his student(s); s/he is an artist whose art is change. And all of this makes her/him a far more likable character than folks like Rorschach and Comedian, making V for Vendetta vastly more accessible than its cousin. V for Vendetta also has a slightly more hopeful finish than Watchmen. There is a tiny possibility that the change begun in fascist England will continue in a positive direction. After all, the mantle of V refuses to die, which is a heck of a lot better than Ozymandias' forced utopia just waiting to explode into a violence far worse than any that has come before. I can close the cover on V for Vendetta and feel refreshed, whereas I usually close the cover on Watchmen and feel the need for a scalding shower to steam off the filth. The former is much more satisfying than the latter. So I have to admit that I enjoy V for Vendetta more than Watchmen. I am more likely to pick it up when I am feeling nostalgic for my comic book youth, but I have no doubt that Watchmen is the superior work.
Date published: 2010-04-09