Variations on a Theme of Euler: Quadratic Forms, Elliptic Curves, and Hopf Maps by Takashi Ono

Variations on a Theme of Euler: Quadratic Forms, Elliptic Curves, and Hopf Maps

byTakashi Ono

Hardcover | November 30, 1994

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An updated and expanded text in English (prepared by the author) of the 1980 Japanese edition (Jikkyo Publishing Co., Ltd., Tokyo). Ono postulates that one aspect of classical and modern number theory, including quadratic forms and space elliptic curves as intersections of quadratic surfaces, can be considered as the number theory of Hopf maps. Useful as a reference for researchers and a text for a graduate- level course on number theory. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

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Title:Variations on a Theme of Euler: Quadratic Forms, Elliptic Curves, and Hopf MapsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:358 pages, 9.25 × 6.1 × 0 inPublished:November 30, 1994Publisher:Springer US

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0306447894

ISBN - 13:9780306447891

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Table of Contents

Introduction. Quadratic Forms. Algebraic Varieties. Plane Algebraic Curves. Space Elliptic Curves. Quadratic Spherical Maps. Hurwitz Problem. Arithmetic of Quadratic Maps. Answers and Hints to Selected Exercises. Appendixes. Index.

Editorial Reviews

From a review of the Japanese-language edition: `A beautifully written book...The statement of the problem is very clear-that is, [the author] claims that one aspect of classical and modern number theory can be considered as the number theory of Hopf maps-and then he solves this problem....skillfully and perspectively organized...This book will be a good introductory textbook...There has never been a textbook similar to this....I highly recommend this book.' Michio Kuga, Professor, late of State University of New York at Stony Brook