Venography of the Inferior Vena Cava and Its Branches by J. ChermetVenography of the Inferior Vena Cava and Its Branches by J. Chermet

Venography of the Inferior Vena Cava and Its Branches

byJ. Chermet, J. M. BigotEditorM. T. Wackenheim

Paperback | December 16, 2011

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Title:Venography of the Inferior Vena Cava and Its BranchesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 28 × 21 × 0.01 inPublished:December 16, 2011Publisher:Springer NatureLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3642675816

ISBN - 13:9783642675812

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Table of Contents

1. Techniques of Angiographic Investigation of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 1.1 Cavography by Percutaneous Bifemoral Approach.- 1.2 Cavography by Percutaneous Unifemoral Approach.- 1.3 Retrograde Iliac Venography.- 1.4 Cavography with Intracaval Catheter - Retrograde Femoral Approach.- 1.5 Cavography with Intracaval Catheter - Anterograde Approach.- 1.6 Occlusive Cavography.- 1.6.1 Uniocclusive Cavography.- 1.6.2 Biocclusive Cavography.- 1.7 Carboxyangiography.- 1.8 Contraindications for Bifemoral Cavography.- 1.9 Complications of Bifemoral Cavography.- References.- 2. Radioanatomy of the Inferior Vena Cava Pitfalls in Interpretation.- 2.1 Anatomy.- 2.1.1 Course.- 2.1.2 Anatomic Relations.- 2.1.3 Tributaries of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 2.2 Physiology.- 2.2.1 Cardiac Factors.- 2.2.2 Respiratory Factors.- 2.3 Radioanatomy - Pitfalls in Interpretation.- 2.3.1 Technical Factors.- 2.3.2 Anatomic Factors.- References.- 3. Congenital Anomalies of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 3.1 Review of the Embryology.- 3.1.1 Posterior Cardinal Veins.- 3.1.2 Subcardinal Veins.- 3.1.3 Supracardinal Veins.- 3.1.4 Conclusion.- 3.2 Congenital Anomalies of the Postrenal Segment.- 3.3 Congenital Anomalies of the Retrohepatic Segment.- 3.3.1 Absence of the Retrohepatic Segment (Azygos Continuation).- 3.3.2 Other Anomalies of the Retrohepatic Segment.- 3.4 Anomalies of the Left Renal Vein and Persistence of the Periaortic Venous Ring.- 3.5 Anomalies in the Termination of the Inferior Vena Cava; Terminations of Abnormal or Aberrant Vessels.- 3.6 Radiosurgical Applications.- 3.6.1 Surgery on the Postrenal Segment of the Aorta.- 3.6.2 Anomalies of the Left Renal Vein: Further Radiosurgical Applications.- References.- 4. Intrinsic Iliocaval Pathology. Thromboembolic Disease of the Iliac Veins and of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 4.1 General Remarks.- 4.2 Thrombophlebitis of the Iliac Veins.- 4.2.1 Definition.- 4.2.2 Clinical Symptoms.- 4.2.3 Preoperative Angiographic Investigations (Phlebography of the Lower Limb and Iliocavography).- 4.2.4 Radioanatomic Forms.- 4.2.5 Evolutive Forms.- 4.2.6 Etiologic Forms.- 4.3 Left Common Iliac Compression Syndrome.- 4.3.1 History - Definition.- 4.3.2 Radioanatomy of the Junction of the LCIV with the Inferior Vena Cava.- 4.3.3 Pathologic Anatomy.- 4.3.4 Etiology: Congenital or Acquired?.- 4.3.5 The Angiographic Features of the Syndrome.- 4.3.6 Common Iliac Compression Syndrome.- 4.4 Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 4.4.1 Frequency, Etiology, Radioanatomic Localization.- 4.4.2 Radioclinical Diagnosis.- 4.5 Membranous Occlusions and Stenoses of the Inferior Vena Cava Termination.- 4.5.1 Etiology.- 4.5.2 Pathologic Anatomy.- 4.5.3 Clinical Symptomatology.- 4.5.4 Evolution.- 4.6 Surgery in Iliofemoral and Iliocaval Phlebitis.- 4.7 Surgical Prevention of Embolic Migration.- References.- 5. Collateral Circulation.- 5.1 General Remarks.- 5.2 Unilateral Iliac Obstruction.- 5.2.1 Collateral System of the Iliofemoral Segment.- 5.2.2 Collateral System of the Common Iliac Segment.- 5.3 Bilateral Iliac Obstruction (Without Caval Obstruction)..- 5.4 Postrenal Occlusion of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 5.4.1 With Recanalization.- 5.4.2 Without Recanalization.- 5.5 Obstruction of the Middle Portion of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 5.6 Obstruction of the Upper Portion of the Inferior Vena Cava.- References.- 6. Retroperitoneal Compressions of the Inferior Vena Cava.- 6.1 The Retroperitoneal Space.- 6.1.1 Limits.- 6.1.2 Contents.- 6.2 Kidney.- 6.3 Adrenals.- 6.4 Arterial Anomalies.- 6.5 Retroperitoneal Tumors.- 6.5.1 Histologic Classification.- 6.5.2 Technique.- 6.5.3 Cavographic Radiosemiology in Retroperitoneal Tumors.- 6.5.4 Value of Cavography in the Diagnosis of Retroperitoneal Tumors.- 6.6 Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Involvements.- 6.6.1 Technique.- 6.6.2 Radiosemiology.- 6.6.3 Place of Cavography in Investigation of Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Involvements.- 6.6.4 Conclusion.- 6.7 Tumors of the Inferior Vena Cava.- References.- 7. Retroperitoneal Fibrosis.- 7.1 Clinical Data.- 7.2 Radiologic Investigations.- 7.2.1 Intravenous Urography.- 7.2.2 Inferior Vena Cavography.- 7.2.3 Other Radiologic Investigations.- 7.3 Treatment.- References.- 8. Inferior Vena Cavography in Hepatic and Intraperitoneal Diseases.- 8.1 Anatomical Considerations.- 8.1.1 Upper Segment (Hepatic Segment).- 8.1.2 Lower Segment.- 8.2 Technique.- 8.2.1 Hepatic Pathology.- 8.2.2 Nonhepatic Abdominal Pathology.- 8.3 Radiologic Features.- 8.3.1 Hepatic Diseases.- References.- 9. Renal Venography.- 9.1 Anatomy.- 9.1.1 Right Renal Vein.- 9.1.2 Left Renal Vein.- 9.1.3 Intrarenal Venous System.- 9.2 Technique.- 9.3 Normal Findings.- 9.3.1 Right Renal Vein.- 9.3.2 Left Renal Vein.- 9.3.3 Intrarenal Veins.- 9.4 Pathologic Findings.- 9.4.1 Pathology of the Vein Proper.- 9.4.2 Tumoral Pathology.- 9.4.3 Other Renal Parenchymal Diseases.- 9.5 Indications.- 9.5.1 Thromboses of the Renal Veins.- 9.5.2 Appreciation of the Extension of Renal and Retroperitoneal Tumors.- 9.5.3 Silent Kidneys.- 9.5.4 Intraparenchymal Infiltration Processes.- 9.5.5 Hematuria with Irregularities in the Renal Pelvis.- 9.5.6 Miscellaneous.- 9.6 Conclusion.- References.- 10. Adrenal Venography.- 10.1 Review of the Anatomy.- 10.2 Technique.- 10.2.1 Right Adrenal Vein Catheterization.- 10.2.2 Left Adrenal Vein Catheterization.- 10.2.3 Withdrawal of Blood Samples.- 10.2.4 Filming.- 10.2.5 Incidents and Accidents.- 10.3 Results.- 10.3.1 Normal Findings.- 10.3.2 Pathologic Findings.- 10.4 Indications.- 10.5 Conclusion.- References.- 11. Spermatic Venography.- 11.1 Embryology.- 11.2 Anatomy.- 11.2.1 The Spermatic Veins.- 11.2.2 Venous Drainage of the Scrotum.- 11.3 Technique.- 11.4 Results.- 11.5 Other Indications.- References.- 12. Hepatic Venography.- 12.1 History.- 12.2 Anatomy.- 12.2.1 Left Hepatic Vein.- 12.2.2 Sagittal or Middle Hepatic Vein.- 12.2.3 Right Hepatic Veins.- 12.2.4 Dorsal Veins.- 12.2.5 Anatomic Variations.- 12.2.6 Anastomoses.- 12.3 Technique.- 12.3.1 Afferent Approach.- 12.3.2 Direct (Transhepatic) Approach.- 12.3.3 Retrograde Approach.- 12.4 Pathologic Findings.- 12.4.1 Cirrhosis.- 12.4.2 Budd-Chiari Syndrome.- 12.4.3 Results.- 12.4.4 The Cardiac Liver.- 12.4.5 Intrahepatic Expansive Processes.- 12.4.6 Perihepatitis Chronica Hyperplastica.- References.- 13. Pelvic Venography in Females.- 13.1 Introduction.- 13.2 Angiographic Exploration Techniques.- 13.2.1 Bifemoral Percutaneous Iliocavography.- 13.2.2 Selective Utero-ovarian Phlebography (Uni- or Bilateral).- 13.2.3 Selective Hypogastric Venography.- 13.2.4 Hypogastric Venography by Pertrochanteral Approach.- 13.2.5 Injection into a Vulvar Varix or into the Dorsal Vein of the Clitoris.- 13.2.6 Phlebohysteroangiography.- 13.2.7 Pelvic Phlebography by Transpubic or Transischiatic Approach.- 13.2.8 Conclusion.- 13.3 Radioanatomy of the Pelvic Veins in Women.- 13.3.1 Hypogastric Venous System.- 13.3.2 Uterine Venous Plexus.- 13.3.3 Ovarian Veins.- 13.3.4 Veins of the Vulva.- 13.4 Pelvic Venography in Genital Tumors.- 13.5 Syndrome of Ureteral Compression by the Ovarian Vein.- 13.6 Pelvic Varices in Women.- 13.7 Pelvic Veins and Pulmonary Embolism.- References.- 14. Lumbar Phlebography.- 14.1 Technique.- 14.2 Radioanatomy.- 14.3 Indications.- 14.3.1 Disk Herniation.- 14.3.2 Lumbar Neuralgia.- 14.3.3 Lumbar Canal Stenosis.- 14.3.4 Tumor.- References.