Victorian Children's Literature: Experiencing Abjection, Empathy, And The Power Of Love by Ruth Y. JenkinsVictorian Children's Literature: Experiencing Abjection, Empathy, And The Power Of Love by Ruth Y. Jenkins

Victorian Children's Literature: Experiencing Abjection, Empathy, And The Power Of Love

byRuth Y. Jenkins

Hardcover | October 4, 2016

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This book reveals how the period's transforming identities affected by social, economic, religious, and national energies offers rich opportunities in which to analyze the relationship between identity and transformation. At the heart of this study is this question: what is the relationship between Victorian children's literature, its readers, and their psychic development?  Ruth Y. Jenkins uses Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection to uncover the presence of cultural anxieties and social tensions in works by Kingsley, MacDonald, Carroll, Stevenson, Burnett, Ballantyne, Nesbit, Tucker, Sewell, and Rossetti.  

 

Ruth Y. Jenkins is Professor of English at California State University, Fresno, USA. She is the author of Reclaiming Myths of Power: The Victorian Spiritual Crisis and Women Writers and numerous articles on Victorian literature and culture, children's literature, feminist, cultural, and writing theory.  
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Title:Victorian Children's Literature: Experiencing Abjection, Empathy, And The Power Of LoveFormat:HardcoverDimensions:190 pagesPublished:October 4, 2016Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3319327615

ISBN - 13:9783319327617

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

 

Acknowledgments                                                                                                           

1-Introduction: Emerging Identities and the Practice of Possibility                             

2-Imagining the Abject in Kingsley, MacDonald, and Carroll: Disrupting Dominant Values and Cultural Identity in Children's Literature  

3- Gender, Abjection, and Coming of Age: Games, Dolls, and Stories                      

4-Constructing the Self: Connection and Separation                                                 

5-Giving Voice to Abjection: Experience and Empathy                                           

6-Engendering Abjection's Sublime: Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden      

7-Embodying Herethics: Rossetti's Speaking Likenesses                                             

Conclusion-Abjection's Sublime: Imagining Love                                                      

Notes                                                                                                                                  

Bibliography

Editorial Reviews

This book reveals how the period's transforming identities affected by social, economic, religious, and national energies offers rich opportunities in which to analyze the relationship between identity and transformation. At the heart of this study is this question: what is the relationship between Victorian children's literature, its readers, and their psychic development?  Ruth Y. Jenkins uses Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection to uncover the presence of cultural anxieties and social tensions in works by Kingsley, MacDonald, Carroll, Stevenson, Burnett, Ballantyne, Nesbit, Tucker, Sewell, and Rossetti.