Victorian Literature And The Anorexic Body by Anna Krugovoy SilverVictorian Literature And The Anorexic Body by Anna Krugovoy Silver

Victorian Literature And The Anorexic Body

byAnna Krugovoy SilverEditorGillian Beer

Paperback | March 30, 2006

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Anna Silver examines the ways nineteenth-century British writers used physical states of the female body--hunger, appetite, fat and slenderness--in the creation of female characters. She argues that anorexia nervosa, first diagnosed in 1873, serves as a paradigm for the cultural ideal of middle-class womanhood in Victorian Britain. Silver uses the works of a wide range of writers (including Charlotte Brontë, Christina Rossetti, Charles Dickens, Bram Stoker and Lewis Carroll) to demonstrate that mainstream models of middle-class Victorian womanhood share important qualities with the beliefs or behaviors of the anorexic female.
Anna Krugovoy Silver is Assistant Professor of English and Director of Womenâs and Gender Studies at Mercer University. She has published essays in Studies in English and Victorians Institute Journal.
Title:Victorian Literature And The Anorexic BodyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:236 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:March 30, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521025516

ISBN - 13:9780521025515

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Waisted women: reading Victorian slenderness; 2. Appetite in Victorian children's literature; 3. Hunger and repression in Shirley and Villette; 4. Vampirism and the anorexic paradigm; 5. Christina Rossetti's sacred hunger; Conclusion: the politics of thinness; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

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"...fascinating and well-researched..." English Literature In Transition 1880-1920