Victorian Medicine and Social Reform: Florence Nightingale among the Novelists by L. Penner

Victorian Medicine and Social Reform: Florence Nightingale among the Novelists

byL. Penner

Hardcover | May 14, 2010

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Victorian Medicine and Social Reform traces Florence Nightingale’s career as a reformer and Crimean war heroine. Her fame as a social activist and her writings including Notes on Nursing and Notes on Matters Affecting the Health, Efficiency and Hospital Administration of the British Army influenced novelists such as Wilkie Collins, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot. Their novels of social realism, in turn, influenced Nightingale's later essays on poverty and Indian famine. This study draws original conclusions on the relationship between Nightingale’s work and its historical context, gender politics, and such twenty-first-century analogues as celebrity activists Angelina Jolie, Al Gore, and Nicole Kidman.

About The Author

Louise Penner is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Details & Specs

Title:Victorian Medicine and Social Reform: Florence Nightingale among the NovelistsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:220 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0 inPublished:May 14, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230615953

ISBN - 13:9780230615953

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Table of Contents

Introduction * Defending Home and Country: Florence Nightingale’s Training of Domestic Detectives * On Giving: Poor Law Reform, “Work,” and “Family” in Nightingale, Dickens, and Stretton * Competing Visions: Nightingale, Eliot, and Victorian Health Reform * Engaging the Victorian Reading Public: Nightingale and the Madras Famine of 1876 * Epilogue

Editorial Reviews

"Rather than showcase an individual blazing trails for those who followed her, Penner wisely aims to demonstrate that 'Nightingale shared ideals about governance and reform in common with reformist essayists, philanthropists, and novelists of her time', even while she critiqued a variety of their philosophical or scientific positions." - Maria Frawley, Ravon