Vignettes from the Late Ming: A Hsiao-p’in Anthology

Paperback | March 1, 1999

Translated byYang Ye

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This anthology presents seventy translated and annotated short essays, or hsiao-p’in, by fourteen well-known sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Chinese writers. Hsiao-p’in, characterized by spontaneity and brevity, were a relatively informal variation on the established classical prose style in which all scholars were trained. Written primarily to amuse and entertain the reader, hsiao-p’in reflect the rise of individualism in the late Ming period and collectively provide a panorama of the colorful life of the age. Critics condemned the genre as escapist because of its focus on life’s sensual pleasures and triviality, and over the next two centuries many of these playful and often irreverent works were officially censored. Today, the essays provide valuable and rare accounts of the details over everyday life in Ming China as well as displays of wit and delightful turns of phrase.

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This anthology presents seventy translated and annotated short essays, or hsiao-p’in, by fourteen well-known sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Chinese writers. Hsiao-p’in, characterized by spontaneity and brevity, were a relatively informal variation on the established classical prose style in which all scholars were trained. Written ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 1 × 1 × 0.51 inPublished:March 1, 1999Publisher:University Of Washington Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295977337

ISBN - 13:9780295977331

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Table of Contents

Vignettes from the Late Ming

AcknowledgmentsHsiao-p'in of the late Ming: An IntroductionEditorial NotesMapKuei Yu-kuang1) Foreword on "Reflections on The Book of Documents"2) A Parable of Urns3) Inscription on the Wall of the Wild Crane Belvedere4) The Craggy Gazebo5) The Hsiang-chi Belvedere6) An Epitaph for ChillyposyLu Shu-sheng1) Inkslab Den2) Bitter Bamboo3) A Trip to Wei Village4) A Short Note about My Six Attendants in Retirement5) Inscription on Two Paintings in My Collection6) Inscription on a Portrait of Tung-p'o Wearing Bamboo Hat and ClogsHsü Wei3) To Ma Ts'e-chih4) Foreword to Yeh Tzu-shu's Poetry5) Another Colophon (On the Model Script "The Seventeenth" in the Collection of Minister Chu of the Court of the Imperial Stud)6) A DreamLi Chih1) Three Fools2) In Praise of Liu Hsieh3) A Lament for the Passing4) Inscription on a Portrait of Confucius at the Iris Buddhist Shrine5) Essay: On the Mind of a ChildT'u Lung1) A Letter in Reply to Li Wei-yin2) To a Friend, while Staying in the Capital3) To a Friend, after Coming Home in RetirementCh'en Chi-ju2) Trips to See Peach in Bloom3) Inscription on Wang Chung-tsun's A History of Flowers4) A Colophon to A History of Flowers5) A Colophon to A Profile of Yao P'ing-chung6) Selections from Privacies in the MountainsYüan Tsung-tao1) Little Western Paradise2) A Trip to Sukhavati Temple3) A Trip to Yüeh-yang4) Selections from MiscellaneaYüan Hung-tao2) First Trip to West Lake3) Waiting for the Moon: An Evening Trip to the Six Bridges4) A Trip to the Six Bridges after a Rain5) Mirror Lake6) A Trip to Brimming Well7) A Trip to High Beam Bridge8) A Biography of the Stupid but Efficient Ones9) Essay: A Biography of Hsü Wen-ch'angYüan Chung-tao1) Foreword to The Sea of Misery2) Shady Terrace3) Selections from Wood Shavings of Daily LifeChung Hsing1) Flower-Washing Brook2) To Ch'en Chi-ju3) A Colophon to My Poetry Collection4) Colophon to A Drinker's Manual (Four Passages)5) Inscription after Yüan Hung-tao's Calligraphy6) Inscription on My PortraitLi Liu-fang1) A Short Note about My Trips to Tiger Hill2) A Short Note about My Trips to Boulder Lake3) Inscriptions on An Album of Recumbent Travels in Chiang-nan (Four Passages)4) Horizontal Pond5) Boulder Lake6) Tiger Hill7) Divinity Cliff1) Inscription on A Picture of Solitary Hill on a Moonlit NightWang Ssu-jen1) A Trip to Brimming Well2) A Trip to Wisdom Hill and Tin Hill3) Passing by the Small Ocean4) Shan-hsi BrookT'an Yüan-ch'un1) First Trip to Black Dragon Pond2) Second Trip to Black Dragon Pond3) Third Trip to Black Dragon PondChang Tai1) Selections from Dream Memories from the T'ao Hut2) A Night Performance at Golden Hill3) Plum Blossoms Bookroom4) Drinking Tea at Pop Min's5) Viewing the Snow from the Mid-Lake Gazebo6) Yao Chien-shu's Paintings7) Moon at Censer Peak8) Liu Ching-t'ing the Storyteller9) West Lake on the Fifteenth Night of the Seventh Month10) Wang Yüeh-sheng11) Crab Parties12) Lang-hsüan, Land of Enchantment1) An Epitaph for Myself2) Preface to Searching for West Lake in DreamsAppendix A: Table of Chinese Historical DynastiesAppendix B: Late Ming through Early Ch'ing Reign PeriodsNotesBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

This anthology presents seventy translated and annotated short essays, or hsiao-p’in, by fourteen well-known sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Chinese writers. Hsiao-p’in, characterized by spontaneity and brevity, were a relatively informal variation on the established classical prose style in which all scholars were trained. Written primarily to amuse and entertain the reader, hsiao-p’in reflect the rise of individualism in the late Ming period and collectively provide a panorama of the colorful life of the age. Critics condemned the genre as escapist because of its focus on life’s sensual pleasures and triviality, and over the next two centuries many of these playful and often irreverent works were officially censored. Today, the essays provide valuable and rare accounts of the details over everyday life in Ming China as well as displays of wit and delightful turns of phrase.The selection is excellent; the best writers are included, and good examples by each. There is no [other] such anthology... available in any Western language. - Jonathan Chaves, The George Washington University