Virgil On The Nature Of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition by Monica R. GaleVirgil On The Nature Of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition by Monica R. Gale

Virgil On The Nature Of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition

byMonica R. Gale

Paperback | November 2, 2006

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Virgil's agricultural poem, the Georgics, forms part of a long tradition of didactic epic going back to the archaic poet Hesiod. This book explores the relationship between the Georgics and earlier works in the didactic tradition, particularly Lucretius' De Rerum Natura ("On the Nature of Things"). It is the first comprehensive study of Virgil's use of Lucretian themes, imagery, ideas and language; it also proposes a new reading of the poem as a whole, as a confrontation between the Epicurean philosophy of Lucretius and the opposing world views of his predecessors.
Title:Virgil On The Nature Of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic TraditionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:November 2, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521028965

ISBN - 13:9780521028967

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Table of Contents

Preface; List of abbreviations; 1. Introduction: influence, allusion, intertextuality; 2. Beginnings and endings; 3. The gods, the farmer and the natural world; 4. Virgil's metamorphoses: mythological allusions; 5. Labor improbus; 6. The wonders of the natural world; 7. The cosmic battlefield: warfare and military imagery; 8. Epilogue: the philosopher and the farmer; Bibliography; Indexes.

Editorial Reviews

"...the very anture of the review of the tradition that makes Gale's book so valuable for anyone interested in major themes in the history of ideas. Gale's clear writing, and the fact that all Greek and Latin passages are translated, make this book accessible to a wide audience." Religious Studies Review