Vision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium: Image as Exegesis in the Homilies of Gregory of Nazianzus by Leslie BrubakerVision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium: Image as Exegesis in the Homilies of Gregory of Nazianzus by Leslie Brubaker

Vision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium: Image as Exegesis in the Homilies of Gregory of…

byLeslie Brubaker

Paperback | December 11, 2008

Pricing and Purchase Info

$68.64

Earn 343 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

This book centers on the copy of the Homilies of Gregory of Nazianzus produced in Constantinople around 880 for the emperor Basil I as a gift from the patriarch Photios. The manuscript includes forty-six full page miniatures, most of which do not directly illustrate the text they accompany, but instead provide a visual commentary. Vision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium deals with how such communication worked, and examines the types of messages that pictures could convey in ninth-century Byzantium.
Title:Vision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium: Image as Exegesis in the Homilies of Gregory of…Format:PaperbackDimensions:572 pages, 9.61 × 6.69 × 1.14 inPublished:December 11, 2008Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521101816

ISBN - 13:9780521101813

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. Sitting the miniatures: imagery in the ninth century; 2. The miniatures: internal evidence; 3. The biographical miniatures: toward image as exegesis; 4. Basil I and visual panegyric; 5. The patriarch Photios and visual exegesis; 6. Mission, martyrdom and visual polemic; 7. Perceptions of divinity; 8. Iconography; 9. Conclusions; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"...Vision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium will be essential for any library serving Byzantine, medieval, or art-historical studies." The Catholic Historical Review