Vision and Rhetoric in Shakespeare: Looking through Language

Hardcover | November 4, 2000

byAlison Thorne

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This major new interdisciplinary study argues that Shakespeare exploited long-established connections between vision, space and language in order to construct rhetorical equivalents for visual perspective. Through a detailed comparison of art and poetic theory in Italy and England, Thorne shows how perspective was appropriated by English writers, who reinterpreted it to suit their own literary concerns and cultural context. Focusing on five Shakespearean plays, she situates their preoccupation with issues of viewpoint in relation to a range of artistic forms and topics from miniatures to masques.

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This major new interdisciplinary study argues that Shakespeare exploited long-established connections between vision, space and language in order to construct rhetorical equivalents for visual perspective. Through a detailed comparison of art and poetic theory in Italy and England, Thorne shows how perspective was appropriated by Engli...

Alison Thorne is Lecturer in English Studies at the University of Strathclyde.

other books by Alison Thorne

Format:HardcoverDimensions:316 pages, 8.77 × 5.65 × 0.93 inPublished:November 4, 2000Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0312226578

ISBN - 13:9780312226572

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Table of Contents

Preface * Alberti, As You Like It and the Process of Invention * English Beholders and the Art of Perspective * Ut Pictura Poesis and the Rhetoric of Perspective * Hamlet and the Art of Looking Diversely on the Self * Troilus and Cressida, "Imagin'd Worth" and the "Bifold Authority" of Anamorphosis * Antony and Cleopatra and the Art of Dislimning * The Tempest and the Art of Masque

Editorial Reviews

"There is much to admire in Vision and Rhetoric in Shakespeare, especially the chapter on Hamlet..."-- Times Literary Supplement