Voices In Ruins: West German Radio Across The 1945 Divide

Hardcover | July 24, 2008

byA. Badenoch

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In the defeat and occupation of Germany that followed the Second World War, the radio remained a vital part of everyday life for most Germans. Voices in Ruins explores in detail the continuities and discontinuities of everyday broadcasting practice at the occupied radio stations. It shows the multiple ways in which the radio stations, in interaction with their listeners, helped to fundamentally shape visions of what would become the Federal Republic, as well as memories of a German past.

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In the defeat and occupation of Germany that followed the Second World War, the radio remained a vital part of everyday life for most Germans. Voices in Ruins explores in detail the continuities and discontinuities of everyday broadcasting practice at the occupied radio stations. It shows the multiple ways in which the radio stations...

ALEXANDER BADENDOCH is Post-Doctoral Researcher at the Technical University of Eindhoven.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:July 24, 2008Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230009034

ISBN - 13:9780230009035

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Table of Contents

Introduction * Keeping Time: the Temporal Structures of Everyday Broadcasting * Familiar Voices: Radio and the Reconstruction of Personality * Time Consuming: Women's Programmes and the Reproduction of the Home * Voices of the Heimat? Markers of Space and Representations of the Region * Conclusion: Voices in Ruins