Waiting for Sophie by Sarah EllisWaiting for Sophie by Sarah Ellis

Waiting for Sophie

bySarah EllisIllustratorCarmen Mok

Hardcover | April 3, 2017

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Waiting is hard. Liam waited through half of kindergarten for his baby sister to be born. Then, when little Sophie finally comes home, he discovers she won't be ready to play with him for a long, long time. As the months pass, everyone says that Liam is Sophie's favourite. He is the best at making her laugh and burp, but laughing and burping are not enough for Liam. With the help of Nana-Downstairs, he designs and builds a Get Older Faster Machine. It doesn't seem to work on Sophie, but maybe Sophie is not the only one doing some growing up.In Waiting for Sophie, multi-award-winning author Sarah Ellis, known for her winsome way with words, introduces a warm, funny, down-to-earth family gracefully navigating a time of change together. Illustrator Carmen Mok renders them sweetly in approachable color illustrations. Appealingly packaged in a hardcover book with a reinforced binding, Liam's trials, mishaps, and triumphs will speak to young readers who are making the transition to chapter books.
Sarah Ellis has written more than twenty novels and picture books for young readers. Her many honors include the Governor General's Award, the Mr. Christie Book Award, the Sheila A. Egoff Children's Book Prize, and the prestigious Vicky Metcalf Award for a body of work. Written from her insightful memories of her own childhood and kee...
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Title:Waiting for SophieFormat:HardcoverDimensions:48 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.5 inPublished:April 3, 2017Publisher:Pajama Press Inc.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1772780200

ISBN - 13:9781772780208

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from It's hard to wait Cute beginner chapter book, about patience, family and living in the moment.
Date published: 2017-04-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Patience and unconditional love is learned Liam is getting very impatient. He has been waiting forever for his baby sister to arrive. Nana-Downstairs bursts into his room one morning with the much anticipated announcement: "Big news. Baby Sophie is on her way." Liam cannot contain his glee. He somersaults out of bed and exclaims: "Waiting. Waiting. Waiting. I waited through half of kindergarten. I waited through my birthday."... "Waiting is the worst thing. I want to jump on waiting and smash it to smithereens and flush it down the toilet." Nana-Downstairs and Liam decide to be bad that day while they wait for Sophie to be released from the hospital and finally make her way home. They wear their pyjamas all day, they eat marshmallow sandwiches for lunch, they paint purple polkadots on the back of Liam's bedroom door, call each other insulting names, and stay up way too late watching movies.. "where the good guys and the bad guys didn't use their words. They just rode horses and beat each other up." Mom and Dad take a taxi home and introduce Sophie to her brand new family for the very first time. Everyone is overjoyed. Liam gets to gently and carefully hold her. In doing so he suddenly realizes how small and helpless she is and that it will be quite a while before she can actually play with him... oh nooooo another season of waiting for her. Will it be worth the wait? Will Sophie be all he expects her to be wrapped up in that precious little sister body? Liam learns valuable life lessons regarding patience and unconditional love, and yes dear reader, he learns beyond a shadow of a doubt that Sophie certainly is worth the wait... after all she is HIS cherished little sister.
Date published: 2016-12-23

Editorial Reviews

This book for early readers is charming....I liked the big brother, big sister story...[and] how the adults didn't fit stereotypes. The drawings are simple, but engaging, and show the emotions of the different characters vividly....I also thought the endpapers were a neat touch, covered with pictures of hand tools. - Canadian Bookworm - 20170620