Walker's Anthology by Deborah ManleyWalker's Anthology by Deborah Manley

Walker's Anthology

EditorDeborah Manley

Hardcover | December 3, 2013

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Several millennia ago two people – possibly an adult and a child – walked in soft, muddy ground in the Olduvai Gorge in present day Kenya, leaving their footprints for archaeologists to discover.  And, still walking, the descendants of people like these two went on to walk right across our world. Walking is as natural to us as breathing and almost every author who has ever written has had something to say on the subject.

 

In this fascinating anthology, Deborah Manley has drawn on writings of more than 50 literary figures from around the world –  WH Auden, Agatha Christie, Captain James Cook, William Dalrymple, Daniel Defoe, EM Forster, Amitav Ghosh, Graham Greene, Rudyard Kipling, Donna Leone, JB Priestley, Bayard Taylor, Paul Theroux, Henry David Thoreau, Colin Thubron and Mark Twain among many others.

 

This is a book for walkers and armchair travellers alike.

Deborah Manley is a writer and editor who has compiled anthologies of Nile travelers and the Trans-Siberian Railway. She is the author of the biography of the 19th century traveler, Henry Salt.
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Title:Walker's AnthologyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:160 pages, 7.1 × 4.75 × 0.98 inPublished:December 3, 2013Publisher:Trailblazer PublicationsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1905864523

ISBN - 13:9781905864522

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Introduction Several millennia ago two people – possibly an adult and a child – walked in soft, muddy ground in the Olduvai Gorge in present day Kenya, leaving their footprints for archaeologists to discover.  And, still walking, the descendants of people like these two went on to walk right across our world.   Once, in order to move around their world, everyone walked.  Then people learned to ride animals or to harness animals to carry them about. Later people created boats,and, much later, invented the train and the motor car to carry them around.  Thus even the pavements of cities became less travelled.  But now, again, walking is on the up.More and more people are realising both how good walking is for our bodies and our health and the pleasure walking can give as we go from one place to another, whether in town or country. And realise too that walking can take us to places no car can reach …   And, of course, one of the great advantages of walking is that one can linger on the way. In towns we can window shop or visit the cathedral or the market, or walk in a park. In the countryside there are myriad places to go to that no motor vehicle can ever reach – places that give us serenity and peaceful views and even silence.   All these benefits appear in this collection of walkers’ accounts of their journeys both through towns, by water, and through open country and woodland … in different weathers, at different times of day and of the year.   In towns and cities, we walk, often with others, along streets, sometimes tree-lined with gardens alongside the pavement, sometimes with buildings rising on either side – skyscrapers perhaps towering overhead – sometimes like a canyon.   There are special occasions when we may walk together with others, for example, Trooping the Colour in London, when soldiers and civilians parade through the city streets, thronged along the way by other people come to watch and to cheer. Sometimes ordinary people march for a cause – almost always a political one.   When we are on holiday we may wander through towns and cities or on country roads and paths – sometimes on rising land, on other walks alongside a river or a canal.  One need not always have a special place to go to – you may be walking just for pleasure – or for exercise.   I have included all these ways of walking in this collection – bringing together the experiences  of such famed walkers  as the poet, William Wordsworth, and his sister Dorothy, both in their beloved Lake District and on the continent.   One of the great advantages of walking is that walkers can penetrate almost anywhere: into the forest of West Africa, along the Roman roads of Britain, through the wooded hills of North America, beside water on the tow paths of canals or by a river or along a sea shore.    In bringing together writers for this book I have used travel guides – like the very detailed, of now somewhat delightfully old fashioned, Baedeker’s guides – which very often highlight walks that their readers may wish to make in the countries they visit. I have brought in writing from novels – from children’s books  - and magazines …   There are various words we have developed for this act of walking: towards the end of a long journey we may ‘trudge’.  If we walk together in an organised manner or for a special reason we are said to march. If we walk in a leisurely, perhaps unplanned way, we wander.   However we walk and for whatever reason, if we walked through soft mud like the mud in the Olduvai Gorge long, long ago, we too would leave footprints.

Table of Contents

(1) Introduction  (2) Setting out  (3) Walking in the countryside  (4) Walking by water  (5) Towns and cities  (6) Walking in winter  (7) Gardens  (8) Marching and processing  (9) Walking at night  (10) Trekking and climbing  (11) Biographies of the walkers  (12) Index