Walking To Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story At A Time by Andrew ForsthoefelWalking To Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story At A Time by Andrew Forsthoefel

Walking To Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story At A Time

byAndrew Forsthoefel

Paperback | April 17, 2018

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A memoir of one young man's coming-of-age on a cross-country trek--told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the highways of America.

At twenty-three, Andrew Forsthoefel walked out the back door of his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, with a backpack, an audio recorder, his copies of Whitman and Rilke, and a sign that read walking to listen. He had just graduated from Middlebury College and was ready to begin his adult life, but he didn't know how. So he decided he'd walk. And listen. It would be a cross-country quest for guidance, and everyone he met would be his guide.

Walking toward the Pacific, he faced an Appalachian winter and a Mojave summer. He met beasts inside: fear, loneliness, doubt. But he also encountered incredible kindness from strangers. Thousands shared their stories with him, sometimes confiding their prejudices, too. Often he didn't know how to respond. How to find unity in diversity? How to stay connected, even as fear works to tear us apart? He listened for answers to these questions, and to the existential questions every human must face, and began to find that the answer might be in listening itself.

Ultimately, it's the stories of others living all along the roads of America that carry this journey and sing out in a hopeful, heartfelt book about how a life is made, and how our nation defines itself at the most human level.

Andrew Forsthoefel is a writer, radio producer, and public speaker. After graduating from Middlebury College in 2011, he spent nearly a year walking across the United States. It was the greatest privilege and blessing of his life. He now facilitates workshops on walking and listening as practices in personal transformation, interconnec...
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Title:Walking To Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story At A TimeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:400 pagesPublished:April 17, 2018Publisher:Bloomsbury USALanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:163286701X

ISBN - 13:9781632867018

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from An okay read This book was a bit disappointing. It started off slow. It got exciting towards the end when she is almost done the trail and then it gets boring again. Not sure why i thought it was boring in those spots, maybe too much detail?
Date published: 2017-10-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Read I loved this book, it was so inspiring.
Date published: 2017-02-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It was okay. Better than wild, which is a very similar concept. But still not the most fascinating book. I think it is harmful because it shows readers that, technically, you can survive a hike like that with very little equipment or preparation. I just hope it didn't inspire anybody to become an unprepared ultra-light hiker, which will risk their lives.
Date published: 2016-12-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Easy read, great book Iam almost done this book. Probably about 150 pages left. I found this book to be an easy read and kept my interest. I think I liked the book so much because I could relate to how she felt about men and unhealthy relationships. Also because I have the same adventure, freespirit in me.
Date published: 2015-12-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Memoir Aspen Matis's newly released memoir, Girl in the Woods, had me captivated from first page to last. From the book's cover: "On my second night of college, I was raped. Shattered and alone, I fled to the Mexican border and headed north through 2,650 miles of desert and mountains to Canada, walking the height of America in search of home. This is the story of how my recklessness became my salvation." More and more, we hear and read stories of walking as a form of therapy and healing. And I agree - walking clears the brain and allows time to think. The physicality of walking such a distance through so many climates is truly overwhelming and simply remarkable. Matis led a sheltered childhood, allowing her mother to make many of her decisions, including dressing her (up until she was sixteen) Yet, on the other hand, she had attempted other solo extended hikes by lying to her parents about where she was. She purposely found a college a great distance from her childhood home to try and find her own footing. But she is unprepared in many ways, both mentally and emotionally for what life away from home will bring. And as the introduction says - the second day there.... I found the first few chapters of Girl in the Woods so compelling and couldn't put the book down. I couldn't wait to see where this walk wold take Aspen - both figuratively and literally. Real life is so unpredictable. Does Matis make choices that everyone would agree with? Absolutely not. Some of those choices put her life in danger - more than once. But, the courage to attempt such a journey has to be applauded. That journey is not just physical - Girl in the Woods is a 'coming of age' story for Matis as she struggles to shed her passivity and find her own footing in the adult world. A large part of that is dealing with the rape and her own sexuality. The descriptions of the trail, the people and the scenery were detailed and vivid and had me imagining what it would be to do such a walk. But this couch potato will continue to live vicariously through others who share their stories. Inevitable comparisons will be made to Cheryl Strayed's Wild. The two women's walks were at different points in their lives and their journeys reflect that. I am fascinated with memoirs - the baring of someone's personal life for public consumption - and criticism. I can't criticize someone's choices and life - I can only say thank you for sharing. Does Matis find her happy ending? Yes - "the trail has shown me how to change" - and no - but that's another story. Isn't that life though? Moving ahead one step at a time, never quite knowing what's around the next bend. Girl in the Woods was a really good read for me.
Date published: 2015-09-25