War Works Hard:  by Dunya MikhailWar Works Hard:  by Dunya Mikhail

War Works Hard:

byDunya MikhailForeword bySimawe SaadiTranslated byWinslo Elizabeth

Paperback | April 5, 2005

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Revolutionary poetry by an exiled Iraqi woman. Winner of a 2004 PEN Translation Fund Award. "Yesterday I lost a country," Dunya Mikhail writes in The War Works Hard, a revolutionary work by an exiled Iraqi poether first to appear in English. Amidst the ongoing atrocities in Iraq, here is an important new voice that rescues the human spirit from the ruins, unmasking the official glorification of war with telegraphic lexical austerity. Embracing literary traditions from ancient Mesopotamian mythology to Biblical and Qur'anic parables to Western modernism, Mikhail's poetic vision transcends cultural and linguistic boundaries with liberating compassion.
Dunya Mikhail was born in Iraq in 1965. While working as a journalist for the Baghdad Observer, she faced increasing threats from the authorities and fled to the United States in the mid 1990s. Her first poetry book in English, The War Works Hard, was named one of twenty-five Books to Remember by the New York Public Library and Diary o...
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Title:War Works Hard:Format:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.29 inPublished:April 5, 2005Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0811216217

ISBN - 13:9780811216210

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Here, the fierceness of the public life meshes with the hard-won tenderness of the private, in a passionate dialectic that makes her voice the inescapable voice of Arab poetry today. — Pierre JorisDunya Mikhail is a woman who speaks like the disillusioned goddesses of Babylon. Blunt as well as subtle, she makes of war a distinct entity, thus turning it into a myth. To her own question, 'What does it mean to die all this death?,' her poems answer that it means to reveal the only redeeming power that we have: the existence of love. — Etel Adnan